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Second Life and the role of educators as regulators

Warren, Ian, Palmer, Darren, King, Tanya and Segrave, Stephen 2008, Second Life and the role of educators as regulators, in ASCILITE 2008 : Hello! Where are you in the landscape of educational technology?, ASCILITE, [Melbourne, Vic.], pp. 1079-1089.

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Title Second Life and the role of educators as regulators
Author(s) Warren, IanORCID iD for Warren, Ian orcid.org/0000-0001-8355-118X
Palmer, DarrenORCID iD for Palmer, Darren orcid.org/0000-0001-6675-1155
King, Tanya
Segrave, Stephen
Conference name Australian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education. Conference (2008 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 30 November - 3 December 2008
Title of proceedings ASCILITE 2008 : Hello! Where are you in the landscape of educational technology?
Editor(s) Atkinson , Roger
McBeath, Clare
Publication date 2008
Conference series Australian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education Conference
Start page 1079
End page 1089
Total pages 11
Publisher ASCILITE
Place of publication [Melbourne, Vic.]
Keyword(s) MMMORPGs
virtual worlds
Second Life
violence
regulation
Summary Regulation, governance and harms stemming from the use of virtual worlds and other Massive Multi Media Online Role Playing Games (MMMORPGs) in higher education, are poorly understood and under-researched issues. Second Life, developed by Linden Labs, provides users with a series of generic ‘terms of service’ and codes of conduct, yet place the bulk of responsibility on individual users or groups to report misbehaviour or develop their own behavioural codes, enforcement procedures and punishments suited to their particular needs. There is no guidebook to assist users in the processes of risk identification and management. As such, the various benefits of MMMORPG technologies could be offset by the risks to users and user-groups from a range of possible harms, including the impact of actual or perceived violence within teaching and learning settings.

While cautioning against the direct translation of real-world regulatory principles into the governance of virtual worlds, this paper suggests theoretical and practical guidance on these issues can be taken from recent criminological developments. Using Lawrence Lessig’s (1999) landmark work on cyber-regulation as a starting point, this paper examines the literature on video-game violence to illustrate the need for educators show awareness of both real and perceived risks in virtual worlds as a core element of an emerging educational pedagogy. We identify how the multiple roles of the virtual-world educator become useful in framing this pedagogy to improve student learning, to dispel myths about the risks of immersive technologies and advocate for their adoption and acceptance in the educational community.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 9780980592702
Language eng
Field of Research 139999 Education not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30018357

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.