Openly accessible

Multicultural places and the idea of home

Marotta, Vince P. 2008, Multicultural places and the idea of home, in TASA 2008 : Re-imagining sociology : the annual conference of the Australian Sociological Association 2008, 2-5 December 2008, The University of Melbourne, TASA, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 1-13.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
marotta-multiculturalplaces-2008.pdf Published version application/pdf 137.68KB 82

Title Multicultural places and the idea of home
Author(s) Marotta, Vince P.
Conference name Australian Sociological Association. Conference (2008 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location University of Melbourne, Victoria
Conference dates 2 - 5 December 2008
Title of proceedings TASA 2008 : Re-imagining sociology : the annual conference of the Australian Sociological Association 2008, 2-5 December 2008, The University of Melbourne
Editor(s) Majoribanks, T.
Barraket, J.
Chang, J-S.
Dawson, A.
Guillemin, M.
Henry-Waring, M.
Kenyon, A.
Kokanovic, R.
Lewis, J.
Lusher, D.
Nolan, D.
Pyett, P.
Robins, R.
Warr, D.
Wyn, J.
Publication date 2008
Conference series Australian Sociological Association Conference
Start page 1
End page 13
Publisher TASA
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) home
homelessness
multiculturalism
movement
modernity
Summary Place identification in urban sociology has traditionally be associated with a sense of ‘being at home’ and connected to the formation of stable and fixed identities. The rise in transnational migration and the increasing number of refugees around the world has made particular regions and communities, within many western nations, culturally diverse. This has led to a re-conceptualisation and re-examination of the relationship between place and home. In light of this new paradigm I explore the existence of multicultural places and investigate the ways, if any, we can speak of ‘being at home’ in these diverse urban places. If home has been traditionally associated with order, sameness and identity while multicultural places are conceptualised in terms of fluidity, contingency, heterogeneity and difference then there seems to be an inherent tension between these two ideas. Are the ideas of home and multiculturalism mutually exclusive? I maintain that they are dialectically interwoven, especially when we acknowledge that otherness and home should not be conceived in binary terms. In order to examine this complex relationship the paper provides a brief discussion of home within the discourses of modernity and postmodernity and then links these discourses to phenomenological and sociological approaches to home. The concluding section demonstrates how home and otherness are expressed in intercultural moments where sameness and diversity rub against each other causing occasional friction but also moments of intercultural dialogue.
Notes Reproduced with kind permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 9780734039842
Language eng
Field of Research 160803 Race and Ethnic Relations
Socio Economic Objective 940111 Ethnicity, Multiculturalism and Migrant Development and Welfare
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2008, The author
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30018363

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of History, Heritage and Society
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 418 Abstract Views, 83 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 14 Aug 2009, 14:07:46 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.