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Whose risk? 'Managing' risk in school leadership

Starr, Karen 2008, Whose risk? 'Managing' risk in school leadership, in AARE 2008 : Climates: Education for Sustainable Futures, Australian Association for Research in Education, Australia, pp. 1-19.

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Title Whose risk? 'Managing' risk in school leadership
Author(s) Starr, Karen
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education annual conference (2008 : Brisbane, Australia)
Conference location Brisbane, Queensland
Conference dates 30 November - 4 December 2008
Title of proceedings AARE 2008 : Climates: Education for Sustainable Futures
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2008
Conference series Australian Association for Research in Education Conference
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education
Place of publication Australia
Summary This article discusses the rise in prominence of 'risk' in schools and the processes and procedures it has triggered in its wake. The discussion commences with formal definitions of 'risk' and how risk is mandated and 'managed' in schools. Alternative views are canvassed and hegemonic emphases in risk policy and practice are critiqued. Taking a socio-cultural approach, the article explores risk from the perspective of school leaders, raising topics elided in risk discourses. The article takes the view that current conceptions of 'risk' have created greater complexity and further risks for the school leaders who 'manage' it. The article investigates school leaders 'and risk' - how risks emerge in the course of everyday school leadership work; school leaders 'at risk' - interrogating the personal and professional risk borne by school leaders through risk policies; and leaders 'as risk' - broaching the rarely raised topic of 'bad' leadership in schools, with its deleterious effects on individuals and whole school communities. These aspects of risk are not found in current literature on risk in educational leadership. The article then goes further to raise the 'undiscussable' topic of risky central leadership practices which render school leaders at even more risk. The article concludes with discussion of risks that school leaders cannot afford not to take in dealing with risk, particularly with regard to collective action to address mandated policy procedures which are detrimental to the foundational issues of teaching, learning, professional agency and community perceptions.
Language eng
Field of Research 130304 Educational Administration, Management and Leadership
139999 Education not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
HERDC collection year 2008
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30018382

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
Higher Education Research Group
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.