The impact of workload on wellbeing, mental health and depression : a longitudinal study of work perception

Lawson, Katrina, Rodwell, John and Noblet, Andrew 2009, The impact of workload on wellbeing, mental health and depression : a longitudinal study of work perception, in IOP 2009 : Proceedings of the 8th Industrial and Organisational Psychology Conference, Australian Psychological Society, Carlton, Vic., pp. 85-89.

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Title The impact of workload on wellbeing, mental health and depression : a longitudinal study of work perception
Author(s) Lawson, Katrina
Rodwell, John
Noblet, Andrew
Conference name Industrial and Organisational Psychology. Conference (8th : 2009 : Sydney, New South Wales)
Conference location Sydney, New South Wales
Conference dates 25-28 June 2009
Title of proceedings IOP 2009 : Proceedings of the 8th Industrial and Organisational Psychology Conference
Editor(s) Langford, Peter H.
Reynolds, Nicholas J.
Kehoe, James E.
Publication date 2009
Conference series Industrial and Organisational Psychology Conference
Start page 85
End page 89
Total pages 5
Publisher Australian Psychological Society
Place of publication Carlton, Vic.
Summary This paper explores the relationships between characteristics of the job (workload, control and support) and organizational justice (distributive, procedural, interpersonal and informational) at Time 1, onto three indicators of psychological health at Time 2 (psychological wellbeing, distress and depression). The sample consisted of sworn members of a state-based police force (n=143). Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that workload was associated with psychological wellbeing, distress and depression at the one-year follow-up. Specifically, high workload at Time 1 was associated with psychological distress and depression at Time 2, and low workload was associated with psychological wellbeing at Time 2. Further, there was a significant relationship between perceived informational justice at Time 1 and psychological wellbeing at Time 2. No significant interaction effects were demonstrated for the job characteristics or organizational justice onto psychological health status. That is, longitudinally, workload directly influences both positive and negative mental health, and informational justice is related to psychological wellbeing. The implications for the demand-control-support model are discussed. The injustice-as-stressor argument was generally not supported.
Notes This paper is located on the 86th page in the attached pdf.
ISBN 9780909881399
Language eng
Field of Research 150311 Organisational Behaviour
Socio Economic Objective 910402 Management
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, Australian Psychological Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30018490

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Faculty of Business and Law
Deakin Graduate School of Business
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