Nestling testosterone controls begging behaviour in the pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca

Goodship, N. M. and Buchanan, K. L. 2007, Nestling testosterone controls begging behaviour in the pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca, Hormones and behavior, vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 454-460.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Nestling testosterone controls begging behaviour in the pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca
Formatted title Nestling testosterone controls begging behaviour in the pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca
Author(s) Goodship, N. M.
Buchanan, K. L.
Journal name Hormones and behavior
Volume number 52
Issue number 4
Start page 454
End page 460
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2007-11
ISSN 0018-506X
1095-6867
Keyword(s) begging
corticosterone
dosing
testosterone
signal evolution
androgen
hormone
offspring solicitation
Summary Begging signals and endogenous testosterone (T) levels of young birds have been shown to be positively correlated. If T is causally involved in controlling the level of begging effort, an endocrine control mechanism could explain the evolution of begging as a costly signal reflecting need. We tested experimentally whether elevated circulating T levels enhanced begging behaviour in nestling pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca. A pilot study confirmed that nestling T levels could be elevated within a natural physiological range using an oral dose of T. After T-dosing, nestling begging behaviour was measured as: i) the duration of begging displays and ii) the maximum height of begging stretches. Our results show that nestling T levels were elevated at 90 min post dosing and that at this time point both measures of begging behaviour were performed more intensely by T-dosed nestlings than controls. Nestling begging displays in response to dosing varied between individuals, which in part was explained either by the date in the breeding season or nestling mass. The results of this study confirm the causal nature of T in controlling nestling begging signals and suggest that it may be part of the mechanism that controls begging behaviour in nestling birds.
Language eng
Field of Research 060201 Behavioural Ecology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30018497

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 14 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 14 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 333 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 04 Sep 2009, 12:30:59 EST by Leanne Swaneveld

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.