You are not logged in.

A sex difference in the cortisol response to tail docking and ACTH develops between 1 and 8 weeks of age in lambs

Turner, A. I., Hosking, B. J., Parr, R. A. and Tilbrook, A. J. 2006, A sex difference in the cortisol response to tail docking and ACTH develops between 1 and 8 weeks of age in lambs, Journal of endocrinology, vol. 188, no. 3, pp. 443-449, doi: 10.1677/joe.1.06328.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title A sex difference in the cortisol response to tail docking and ACTH develops between 1 and 8 weeks of age in lambs
Author(s) Turner, A. I.ORCID iD for Turner, A. I. orcid.org/0000-0002-0682-2860
Hosking, B. J.
Parr, R. A.
Tilbrook, A. J.
Journal name Journal of endocrinology
Volume number 188
Issue number 3
Start page 443
End page 449
Publisher Society for Endocrinology
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2006-03
ISSN 0022-0795
1479-6805
Summary It is important to understand factors that may influence responses to stress, as these factors may also influence vulnerability to pathologies that can develop when stress responses are excessive or prolonged. It is clear that, in adults, the sex of an individual can influence the cortisol response to stress in a stressor specific manner. Nevertheless, the stage of development at which these sex differences emerge is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that there are sex differences in the cortisol response to tail docking and ACTH in lambs of 1 and 8 weeks of age. We also established cortisol responses in males when tail docking was imposed alone and in combination with castration at these ages. In experiment 1, 1 and 8 week old male and female lambs were subjected to sham handling, tail docking or, in males, a combination of tail docking and castration. In experiment 2, we administered ACTH (1.0 IU/kg) to male and female lambs at 1 and 8 weeks of age. There were significant cortisol responses to all treatments at both ages. Sex differences in the cortisol responses to tail docking and ACTH developed between 1 and 8 weeks of age, with females having greater responses than males. The data suggest that the mechanism for the sex difference in response to tail docking may involve the adrenal glands. At both ages, in males, the cortisol response to the combined treatment of tail docking and castration was significantly greater than that for tail docking alone.
Language eng
DOI 10.1677/joe.1.06328
Field of Research 110306 Endocrinology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Society for Endocrinology
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30018608

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 12 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 516 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 09 Sep 2009, 15:12:49 EST by Rachael Wilson

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.