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Plasma cholinesterase characteristics in native Australian birds : significance for monitoring avian species for pesticide exposure

Fildes, Karen, Szabo, Judit K., Hooper, Michael J., Buttemer, William A. and Astheimer, Lee B. 2009, Plasma cholinesterase characteristics in native Australian birds : significance for monitoring avian species for pesticide exposure, Emu, vol. 109, no. 1, pp. 41-47, doi: 10.1071/MU08027.

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Title Plasma cholinesterase characteristics in native Australian birds : significance for monitoring avian species for pesticide exposure
Author(s) Fildes, Karen
Szabo, Judit K.
Hooper, Michael J.
Buttemer, William A.
Astheimer, Lee B.
Journal name Emu
Volume number 109
Issue number 1
Start page 41
End page 47
Total pages 7
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Collingwood, Vic.
Publication date 2009-03
ISSN 0158-4197
1448-5540
Summary Cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides are applied throughout Australia to control agricultural pests. Blood plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity is a sensitive indicator of exposure to organophosphorus insecticides in vertebrates. To aid biomonitoring and provide reference data for wildlife pesticide-risk assessment, plasma acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activities were characterised in nine species of native bird: King Quails (Excalfactoria chinensis), Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), White-plumed Honeyeaters (Lichenostomas penicillatus), Yellow-throated Miners (Manorina flavigula), Willie Wagtails (Rhipidura leucophrys), Australian Reed-Warblers (Acrocephalus australis), Brown Songlarks (Cincloramphus cruralis), Double-barred Finches (Taeniopygia bichenovii) and Australasian Pipits (Anthus novaeseelandiae). Plasma ChE activities in all species were within the range of most other avian species and all but one contained AChE and BChE; no AChE was present in King Quail, which has not previously been reported for any species. The lowest detectable plasma AChE activity was 0.10 μmol min–1 mL–1 in Budgerigars and the highest was 0.86 μmol min–1 mL–1 in Australian Reed-Warblers. BChE in the plasma ranged from 0.37 μmol min–1 mL–1 in Double-barred Finches to 0.90 μmol min–1 mL–1 in White-plumed Honeyeaters and Australian Reed-Warblers. The lowest proportion of AChE was found in Budgerigars (12.8%) and highest in Willie Wagtails (67.8%). No differences were detected in ChE activity at any time of day in Budgerigars and Zebra Finches (Taeniopygia guttata), although there was a significant difference in all ChE activity between seasons in Zebra Finches.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/MU08027
Field of Research 060399 Evolutionary Biology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, CSIRO Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30018638

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Created: Thu, 10 Sep 2009, 12:28:51 EST by Leanne Swaneveld

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