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The effect of acute fenitrotion exposure on a variety of physiological indices, including avian aerobic metabolism during exercise and cold exposure

Fildes, Karen, Astheimer, Lee B. and Buttemer, William A. 2009, The effect of acute fenitrotion exposure on a variety of physiological indices, including avian aerobic metabolism during exercise and cold exposure, Environmental toxicology and chemistry, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 388-394, doi: 10.1897/08-297.1.

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Title The effect of acute fenitrotion exposure on a variety of physiological indices, including avian aerobic metabolism during exercise and cold exposure
Author(s) Fildes, Karen
Astheimer, Lee B.
Buttemer, William A.
Journal name Environmental toxicology and chemistry
Volume number 28
Issue number 2
Start page 388
End page 394
Total pages 7
Publisher Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Place of publication Pensacola, Fla.
Publication date 2009-02
ISSN 0730-7268
1552-8618
Keyword(s) organophosphates
plasma cholinesterase
exercise performance
cold exposure
aerobic metabolism
Summary The effect of fenitrothion exposure on birds was examined by measuring aerobic metabolism, blood hemoglobin content, plasma cholinesterases, and body weight for up to 21 d postdose. Peak metabolic rate was measured in a flight chamber in three-dose groups of house sparrows (Passer domesticus; 100 mg/kg = high, 60 mg/kg = medium, 30 mg/kg = low) and one-dose groups of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata; 3 mg/kg) and king quails (Coturnix chinensis; 26 mg/kg). Aerobic metabolism was measured during 1 h of exposure to subfreezing thermal conditions in low-dose house sparrows and king quails (26 mg/kg). Fenitrothion had no effect on metabolic rate during cold exposure or on blood hemoglobin at any time. By contrast, aerobic performance during exercise in sparrows was reduced by 58% (high), 18% (medium), and 20% (low), respectively, 2 d postdose. House sparrows (high) had the longest recovery period for peak metabolic rate (21 d) and plasma cholinesterase activity (14 d). House sparrows (high) and treated king quails had significantly lower myoglobin at 48 h postdose, whereas myoglobin was invariant in zebra finches and house sparrows (medium and low). Cholinesterase was maximally inhibited at 6 h postdose, and had recovered within 24 h, in house sparrows (low), king quails, and zebra finches. Exercise peak metabolic rate in zebra finches and king quails was reduced by 23% at 2 d and 3 d, respectively, despite these birds being asymptomatic in both behavior and plasma cholinesterase activities.
Language eng
DOI 10.1897/08-297.1
Field of Research 060199 Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, SETAC
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30018646

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Created: Thu, 10 Sep 2009, 14:38:59 EST by Leanne Swaneveld

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