You are not logged in.

Effects of sublethal fenitrothion ingestion on cholinesterase inhibition, standard metabolism, thermal preference, and prey-capture ability in the Australian central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps, Agamidae)

Bain, David, Buttemer, William A., Astheimer, Lee, Fildes, Karen and Hooper, Michael J. 2004, Effects of sublethal fenitrothion ingestion on cholinesterase inhibition, standard metabolism, thermal preference, and prey-capture ability in the Australian central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps, Agamidae), Environmental toxicology and chemistry, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 109-116, doi: 10.1897/02-555.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Effects of sublethal fenitrothion ingestion on cholinesterase inhibition, standard metabolism, thermal preference, and prey-capture ability in the Australian central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps, Agamidae)
Formatted title Effects of sublethal fenitrothion ingestion on cholinesterase inhibition, standard metabolism, thermal preference, and prey-capture ability in the Australian central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps, Agamidae)
Author(s) Bain, David
Buttemer, William A.
Astheimer, Lee
Fildes, Karen
Hooper, Michael J.
Journal name Environmental toxicology and chemistry
Volume number 23
Issue number 1
Start page 109
End page 116
Publisher Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Place of publication Pensacola, Fla.
Publication date 2004-01
ISSN 0730-7268
1552-8618
Keyword(s) lizard
cholinesterase activity
sublethal effects
organophosphate
behavioral thermoregulation
Summary The central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) is a medium-sized lizard that is common in semiarid habitats in Australia and that potentially is at risk of fenitrothion exposure from use of the chemical in plague locust control. We examined the effects of single sublethal doses of this organophosphate (OP; low dose = 2.0 mg/kg; high dose = 20 mg/kg; control = vehicle alone) on lizard thermal preference, standard metabolic rate, and prey-capture ability. We also measured activities of plasma total cholinesterase (ChE) and acetylcholinesterase before and at 0, 2, 8, 24, 120, and 504 h after OP dosing. Predose plasma total ChE activity differed significantly between sexes and averaged 0.66 ± 0.06 and 0.45 ± 0.06 μmol/min/ml for males and females, respectively. Approximately 75% of total ChE activity was attributable to butyrylcholinesterase. Peak ChE inhibition reached 19% 2 h after OP ingestion in the low-dose group, and 68% 8 h after ingestion in high-dose animals. Neither OP doses significantly affected diurnal body temperature, standard metabolic rate, or feeding rate. Plasma total ChE levels remained substantially depressed up to 21 d after dosing in the high-dose group, making this species a useful long-term biomonitor of OP exposure in its habitat.
Language eng
DOI 10.1897/02-555
Field of Research 060399 Evolutionary Biology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, SETAC
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30018653

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 28 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 27 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 565 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 10 Sep 2009, 15:18:03 EST by Leanne Swaneveld

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.