Tennis playing initiated before puberty leads to greater skeletal benefits in peri-pubertal boys than girls when training is maintained

Ducher, Gaele, Black, Jeni, Daly, Robin, Turner, Charles and Bass, Shona 2008, Tennis playing initiated before puberty leads to greater skeletal benefits in peri-pubertal boys than girls when training is maintained, in ASICS conference of science and medicine in sport 2008 : abstracts, Elsevier, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, pp. S7-S7.


Title Tennis playing initiated before puberty leads to greater skeletal benefits in peri-pubertal boys than girls when training is maintained
Author(s) Ducher, Gaele
Black, Jeni
Daly, Robin
Turner, Charles
Bass, Shona
Conference name ASICS conference of science and medicine in sport (2008 : Hamilton Is., Queensland)
Conference location Hamilton Island
Conference dates 16-18 October 2008
Title of proceedings ASICS conference of science and medicine in sport 2008 : abstracts
Publication date 2008
Start page S7
End page S7
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Summary Introduction: The purpose of the study was to compare the exercise-induced changes in bone mass and geometry between boys and girls.

Methods: Eighty competitive tennis players (43 boys, 37 girls) aged 7–19 years participated. Pubertal status was self-assessed using Tanner stages (TS 1–5). The dominant and nondominant humeri were compared for DXA-derived bone mass (BMC) and MRI-derived bone geometry [total bone area (TA), medullary area (MA) and cortical bone area (CA)].

Results/Discussion: Exercise-induced side-to-side differences in BMC, TA and CA were significant from TS1 to 5 in boys and girls (p < 0.06). Pre-pubertal (TS1) girls and boys show similar side-to-side difference in BMC after adjustment for training volume (19% vs. 15%, ns). Similar findings were found forTA and CA. In contrast, during puberty (TS2-4) boys displayed greater side-to-side differences than girls for BMC (27% vs. 18%, p < 0.05), TA (13–15% vs. 8%, p < 0.05) and CA (32% vs. 20%, p < 0.01), even after adjustment for tennis history. Girls partly compensated for the lack of an exercise-induced increase in bone size by a reduction of the medullary cavity on the dominant side (−5.5 to −13%, p < 0.05). In post-puberty (TS 5 or postmenarche), the size of the medullary cavity remained smaller on the dominant side in girls (−5% to −9%, p = 0.1–0.05??) whereas no such reduction was observed in boys.

Conclusion: Regular exercise initiated before puberty and maintained throughout puberty leads to greater skeletal benefits in peri-pubertal boys than girls for bone mass and bone size, two of the major determinants of bone strength.
Notes Published in "Journal of science and medicine in sport" Vol.12 Supplement 1, January 2009
ISSN 1440-2440
Language eng
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
Copyright notice ©2008, Elsevier Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019136

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 410 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 11 Sep 2009, 10:39:25 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.