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The influence of heat on biological activity and concentration of oleocanthal - a natural anti-inflammatory agent

Cicerale, Sara, Conlan, Xavier, Barnett, Neil, Sinclair, Andrew and Keast, Russell 2008, The influence of heat on biological activity and concentration of oleocanthal - a natural anti-inflammatory agent, in Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition : proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia, HEC Press, Kent Town, S. Aust..

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Title The influence of heat on biological activity and concentration of oleocanthal - a natural anti-inflammatory agent
Author(s) Cicerale, Sara
Conlan, Xavier
Barnett, Neil
Sinclair, Andrew
Keast, Russell
Conference name Nutrition Society of Australia. Scientific Meeting (32nd : 2008 : Glenelg, S. Aust.)
Conference location Glenelg, S. Aust.
Conference dates 30 Nov - 3 Dec 2008
Title of proceedings Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition : proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia
Publication date 2008
Publisher HEC Press
Place of publication Kent Town, S. Aust.
Keyword(s) olive oil
HPLC
sensory
Mediterranean diet
health benefits
Summary Background – The olive oil phenolic, oleocanthal is a natural non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compound that irritates the oropharynx in a dose-dependent manner. It has been proposed that the biological activity of oleocanthal is partially responsible for the beneficial health effects of the Mediterranean diet. Virgin olive oil containing oleocanthal is often added as an ingredient in a number of cooked dishes and therefore it is of great importance to understand how best to preserve the putative health promoting benefits of this compound, as olive oil phenolics are
subject to heat degradation.

Objective – To investigate if oleocanthal is thermally degraded or its biological activity reduced during cooking.

Design – One extra virgin olive oil containing 54mg/kg oleocanthal was heated at varying temperatures (100°C, 170°C and 240°C) for set time periods (0, 1, 5, 20, 60, 90 min). Oleocanthal concentrations were quantified using HPLC and its biological activity determined with a taste bioassay measuring the intensity of throat irritation.

Outcomes – Results demonstrated that oleocanthal was heat stable compared with other olive oil phenolics, with a maximum loss of 16% as determined by HPLC analysis. In contrast, there was a significant decrease of up to 38% (p<0.05) in the biological activity of oleocanthal as determined by the taste bioassay.

Conclusions – Minimal degradation of oleocanthal concentration was observed upon heating however a significant decrease in the biological activity of this compound was noted with extended heating time. This has important implications for health in that, consumers may be unable to reap all of the putative health benefits associated with oleocanthal when adding virgin olive oil as an ingredient to dishes requiring prolonged heat treatment.
Notes Published as Vol. 17 Supplement in APJCN : Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia
ISSN 0314-1004
0964-7058
Language eng
Field of Research 170112 Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019155

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.