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Takeaway food consumption, diet quality and abdominal obesity in young adults

Smith, K., McNaughton, S., Gall, S., Blizzard, C., Dwyer, T. and Venn, A. 2008, Takeaway food consumption, diet quality and abdominal obesity in young adults, in NSA 2008 : Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia Annual Scientific Meeting, HEC Press, [Adelaide, S.Aust].

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Title Takeaway food consumption, diet quality and abdominal obesity in young adults
Author(s) Smith, K.
McNaughton, S.
Gall, S.
Blizzard, C.
Dwyer, T.
Venn, A.
Conference name Nutrition Society of Australia Scientific Meeting (2008 : Adelaide, S.Aust.)
Conference location Adelaide, S.Aust.
Conference dates 30 Nov.-3 Dec. 2008
Title of proceedings NSA 2008 : Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia Annual Scientific Meeting
Publication date 2008
Publisher HEC Press
Place of publication [Adelaide, S.Aust]
Summary Background - Takeaway food consumption is associated with a higher BMI and poorer diet quality in the USA but little is known about the association in Australians.
Objective - To examine if takeaway food consumption is associated with abdominal obesity and poorer diet quality in young Australian adults.
Design - A national sample of 1,277 men and 1,585 women aged 26-36 completed a self-administered questionnaire on demographic and lifestyle factors, a 127 item food frequency questionnaire, and usual frequency of fruit, vegetable and takeaway food consumption. Dietary intake was compared with the dietary recommendations of the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating. A pedometer was worn for seven days. Waist circumference was measured and moderate abdominal obesity was defined as ≥94 cm for men and ≥80 cm for women. Prevalence ratios (PR) were calculated using log binomial regression with eating takeaway food once a week or less as the reference group.
Outcomes - Consumption of takeaway food twice a week or more was reported by more men (37.9%) than women (17.7%). Participants eating takeaway food at least twice a week were less likely to meet the guidelines for vegetables (P<0.05 men and women), fruit (P<0.001 men and women), dairy (P<0.01 men and women), extra foods (P=0.001 men and women), breads and cereals (P<0.05 men only), lean meats and alternatives (P<0.05 women only) and overall met significantly fewer dietary guidelines (P<0.001 men and women) than participants eating takeaway less than twice per week. After adjusting for confounding variables (age, physical activity, TV viewing, and employment status) consuming takeaway food twice a week or more was associated with a 31% higher prevalence of moderate abdominal obesity in men (PR 1.31; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.61) and a 25% higher prevalence in women (PR 1.25; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.50).
Conclusion - Eating takeaway food twice a week or more was associated with poorer diet quality and a higher prevalence of moderate abdominal obesity in both young men and young women.
Notes Conference Website : http://www.nsa.asn.au/conferences/2008/index.php The extract of this paper has been published in : Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol 17, No. 3, 2008.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920205 Health Education and Promotion
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
Copyright notice ©2008, HEC Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019216

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.