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Teaching and learning force as a representational issue : insights from a classroom video study

Hubber, Peter, Tytler, Russell and Haslam, Maria F. 2008, Teaching and learning force as a representational issue : insights from a classroom video study, in NARST 2008 : Impact of Science Education Research on Public Policy : National Association for Research in Science Teaching Annual International Conference, National Association for Research in Science Teaching, Baltimore, MD, pp. 157-158.

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Title Teaching and learning force as a representational issue : insights from a classroom video study
Formatted title Teaching and learning from a representational perspective : insights from a classroom video study
Author(s) Hubber, Peter
Tytler, Russell
Haslam, Maria F.
Conference name National Association for Research in Science Teaching. Conference (2008 : Baltimore, Maryland)
Conference location Baltimore, Md.
Conference dates March 30 - April 2 2008
Title of proceedings NARST 2008 : Impact of Science Education Research on Public Policy : National Association for Research in Science Teaching Annual International Conference
Editor(s) Gilmer, Penny J.
Czerniak, Charlene M.
Osborne, Jonathan
Kyle, Jr. William C.
Publication date 2008
Start page 157
End page 158
Publisher National Association for Research in Science Teaching
Place of publication Baltimore, MD
Summary An enormous amount of research in the conceptual change tradition has shown the difficulty of learning fundamental science concepts, yet conceptual change schemes have failed to convincingly demonstrate improvements in supporting significant student learning. Recent work in cognitive science has challenged this purely conceptual view of learning, emphasising the role of languages, and the importance of personal and contextual aspects of  understanding science. The research described in this paper is designed around the notion that learning involves the recognition and development of students’ representational resources. In particular, we argue that difficulties with the concept of force are fundamentally representational in nature. The paper describes the planning and implementation of a classroom sequence in force that focuses on representations and their negotiation, and reports on the effectiveness of this perspective in guiding teaching and learning. Classroom sequences involving three teachers 158 2008 NARST Annual International Conference were videotaped using a combined focus on the teacher and groups of students. Video analysis software was used to code the variety of representations used, and sequences of representational negotiation. Stimulated recall interviews were conducted with teachers and students. The paper will report on the effect of this approach on teacher knowledge and pedagogy, and on student learning of force.
Language eng
Field of Research 130212 Science, Technology and Engineering Curriculum and Pedagogy
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2008, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019278

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
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