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Being resilient as described by people who experience mental illness

Edward, Karen-Leigh 2008, Being resilient as described by people who experience mental illness, in ACMHN 2008 : Mental health nursing - a broad canvas : the art of mental health nursing in the age of technology and science : Annual Conference of the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses, Australian College of Mental Health Nurses, [Melbourne, Vic.].

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Title Being resilient as described by people who experience mental illness
Author(s) Edward, Karen-Leigh
Conference name Australian College of Mental Health Nurses. Conference (34th : 2008 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 6-10 Oct. 2008
Title of proceedings ACMHN 2008 : Mental health nursing - a broad canvas : the art of mental health nursing in the age of technology and science : Annual Conference of the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses
Publication date 2008
Publisher Australian College of Mental Health Nurses
Place of publication [Melbourne, Vic.]
Summary Aim: The purpose of this research was to explore resilience as described by consumers of mental health services in Australia who have experienced mental illness.

Background: Most qualitative research pertaining to resilience has focused on child and adolescent groups. In relation to the Australian context there appears to be a paucity of qualitative studies on resilience and the experience of mental illness.

Method: The study utilized a phenomenological approach elucidated by Colaizzi as the philosophical underpinnings of the study. In keeping with Colaizzi’s (1978) approach to inquiry, information was gathered through in-depth, semi-structured individual interviews. Information analysis utilised Colaizzi’s (1978) original seven-step approach with the inclusion of two additional steps, making this study’s analysis a nine step process.

Findings: Emergent themes explicated from participant transcripts follow: Universality, Acceptance, Naming and knowing, Faith, Hope, Being the fool and, Striking a balance, Having meaning and meaningful relationships, and ‘Just doing it’. The emergent conceptualisation which encapsulated the themes was; Viewing life from the ridge with eyes wide open. - choosing to walk through the darkness all the while knowing the risks and dangers ahead and making a decision for life amid ever-present hardships.

Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest being resilient can be learnt and therefore, should be a fundamental consideration in guiding therapeutic interventions within the context of clinical practice.
Language eng
Field of Research 170113 Social and Community Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920209 Mental Health Services
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019299

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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Created: Fri, 11 Sep 2009, 10:41:21 EST

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