You are not logged in.

Development of mound-building in Australian brush-turkeys (Alectura lathami) : the role of learning, testosterone and body mass

Goth, Ann and Astheimer, Lee 2006, Development of mound-building in Australian brush-turkeys (Alectura lathami) : the role of learning, testosterone and body mass, Australian journal of zoology, vol. 54, no. 2, pp. 71-78, doi: 10.1071/ZO06007.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Development of mound-building in Australian brush-turkeys (Alectura lathami) : the role of learning, testosterone and body mass
Formatted title Development of mound-building in Australian brush-turkeys (Alectura lathami): the role of learning, testosterone and body mass
Author(s) Goth, Ann
Astheimer, Lee
Journal name Australian journal of zoology
Volume number 54
Issue number 2
Start page 71
End page 78
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Collingwood, Vic.
Publication date 2006-05-11
ISSN 0004-959X
1446-5698
Summary Australian brush-turkeys (Alectura lathami) hatch in incubation mounds of organic material and have no parental role models to learn from. When raised in outdoor aviaries, without adults, four of six males built incubation mounds at an early age of 4.5–9 months. The two males without mounds were the only ones without detectable levels of testosterone (T) at 4.5 months, whereas body mass did not explain the presence or absence of mound building. At the age of 11 months, all males had detectable T, including those without mounds. This study also investigated the development of social dominance in males kept in mixed-sex groups for 4.5 months. At this latter age, higher-ranked males tended to have higher T levels (P = 0.076), whereas dominance ranks at 4.5 months were not correlated with body mass or size, either at this age or at hatching. Overall, these results suggest that mound building develops without learning, and there is a relationship between T levels and dominance status as well as the absence or presence of mound building. These findings contribute to discussions on the role of learning in behavioural development and the role of T and body mass in avian life history.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/ZO06007
Field of Research 060199 Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, CSIRO
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019387

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 653 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 11 Sep 2009, 14:55:49 EST by Leanne Swaneveld

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.