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Uteroplacental insufficiency and reducing litter size alters skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in a sex-specific manner in the adult rat

Wadley, Glenn D., Siebel, Andrew L., Cooney, Greg J., McConell, Glenn K., Wlodek, Mary E. and Owens, Julie A. 2008, Uteroplacental insufficiency and reducing litter size alters skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in a sex-specific manner in the adult rat, American journal of physiology : endocrinology and metabolism, vol. 294, no. 3, pp. 861-869, doi: 10.1152/ajpendo.00037.2008.

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Title Uteroplacental insufficiency and reducing litter size alters skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in a sex-specific manner in the adult rat
Author(s) Wadley, Glenn D.ORCID iD for Wadley, Glenn D. orcid.org/0000-0002-6617-4359
Siebel, Andrew L.
Cooney, Greg J.
McConell, Glenn K.
Wlodek, Mary E.
Owens, Julie A.
Journal name American journal of physiology : endocrinology and metabolism
Volume number 294
Issue number 3
Start page 861
End page 869
Total pages 9
Publisher American Physiological Society
Place of publication Bethesda, Md.
Publication date 2008-03
ISSN 0193-1849
1522-1555
Keyword(s) programming
glucose metabolism
intrauterine growth restriction
Summary Uteroplacental insufficiency has been shown to impair insulin action and glucose homeostasis in adult offspring and may act in part via altered mitochondrial biogenesis and lipid balance in skeletal muscle. Bilateral uterine vessel ligation to induce uteroplacental insufficiency in offspring (Restricted) or sham surgery was performed on day 18 of gestation in rats. To match the litter size of Restricted offspring, a separate cohort of sham litters had litter size reduced to five at birth (Reduced Litter), which also restricted postnatal growth. Remaining litters from sham mothers were unaltered (Control). Offspring were studied at 6 mo of age. In males, both Restricted and Reduced Litter offspring had reduced gastrocnemius PPAR γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1 α) mRNA and protein, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) and cytochrome oxidase (COX) III mRNA (P < 0.05), whereas only Restricted had reduced skeletal muscle COX IV mRNA and protein and glycogen (P < 0.05), despite unaltered glucose tolerance, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) and intramuscular triglycerides. In females, only gastrocnemius mtTFA mRNA was lower in Reduced Litter offspring (P < 0.05). Furthermore, glucose tolerance was not altered in any female offspring, although HOMA and intramuscular triglycerides increased in Restricted offspring (P < 0.05). It is concluded that restriction of growth due to uteroplacental insufficiency alters skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolic characteristics, such as glycogen and lipid levels, in a sex-specific manner in the adult rat in the absence of impaired glucose tolerance. Furthermore, an adverse postnatal environment induced by reducing litter size also restricts growth and alters skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolic characteristics in the adult rat.
Language eng
DOI 10.1152/ajpendo.00037.2008
Field of Research 110601 Biomechanics
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, American Physiological Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019391

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