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Sources of stress in impoverished neighbourhoods : insights into links between neighbourhood environments and health

Warr, Deborah, Feldman, Peter, Tacticos, Theonie and Kelaher, Margaret 2009, Sources of stress in impoverished neighbourhoods : insights into links between neighbourhood environments and health, Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 25-33.

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Title Sources of stress in impoverished neighbourhoods : insights into links between neighbourhood environments and health
Author(s) Warr, Deborah
Feldman, Peter
Tacticos, Theonie
Kelaher, Margaret
Journal name Australian and New Zealand journal of public health
Volume number 33
Issue number 1
Start page 25
End page 33
Publisher Public Health Association of Australia
Place of publication Canberra, A.C.T.
Publication date 2009-02
ISSN 1326-0200
1753-6405
Keyword(s) social environment
social conditions
environment and public health
socio-economic factors
health status
Summary Objective : We consider associations between individual, household and area-level characteristics and self-reported health.
Method : Data is taken from baseline surveys undertaken in 13 socio-economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods in Victoria (n=3,944). The neighbourhoods are sites undergoing Neighbourhood Renewal (NR), a State government initiative redressing place-based disadvantage.
Analysis :This focused on the relationship between area and compositional factors and self-reported health. Area was coded into three categories; LGA, NR residents living in public housing (NRPU) and NR residents who lived in private housing (NRPR). Compositional factors included age, gender, marital status, identifying as a person with a disability, level of education, unemployment and receipt of pensions/benefits.
Results : There was a gradient in socio-economic disadvantage on all measures. People living in NR public housing were more disadvantaged than people living in NR private housing who, in turn, were more disadvantaged than people in the same LGA. NR public housing residents reported the worst health status and LGA residents reported the best.
Conclusions : Associations between compositional characteristics of disability, educational achievement and unemployment income and poorer self-reported health were shown. They suggested that area characteristics, with housing policies, may be contributing to differences in self-reported health at the neighbourhood level.
Implications : The clustering of socio-economic disadvantage and health outcomes requires the integration of health and social support interventions that address the circumstances of people and places.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
160802 Environmental Sociology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Public Health Association of Australia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019448

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.