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Research ethics, reconciliation, and strengthening the research relationship in Indigenous health domains : an Australian perspective

Johnstone, Megan-Jane 2007, Research ethics, reconciliation, and strengthening the research relationship in Indigenous health domains : an Australian perspective, International journal of intercultural relations, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 391-406, doi: 10.1016/j.ijintrel.2006.09.003.

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Title Research ethics, reconciliation, and strengthening the research relationship in Indigenous health domains : an Australian perspective
Author(s) Johnstone, Megan-Jane
Journal name International journal of intercultural relations
Volume number 31
Issue number 3
Start page 391
End page 406
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2007-05
ISSN 0147-1767
1873-7552
Keyword(s) ethics
research
reconciliation
aboriginal health
Indigenous health
Australia
Summary Australia has one of the best health care systems in the world. Despite this, the health of Indigenous Australians remains poor in comparison to non-Indigenous Australians and in comparison to other Indigenous peoples in other developed countries, such as Canada, the USA and New Zealand. Although the disparities in Indigenous health are the result of a complex array of interacting social and political processes, the historical failings of the nation's research endeavours to directly benefit the health status of Indigenous peoples are bring increasingly implicated in the status quo. Because of their shared memories of past bad experiences, Indigenous communities are profoundly distrustful of non-Indigenous health researchers. As a result of this distrust, opportunities to improve the performance, accountability and benefits of health research in Indigenous health domains are being lost—to the further detriment of the health of Indigenous peoples. In an attempt to redress this distrust and strengthen the research relationship in Indigenous health domains, various national research ethics guidelines and frameworks have been developed. It is evident, however, that if the research relationship in Indigenous health domains is to be improved, researchers need to do much more than merely uphold prescribed rules and guidelines. This article contends that if the research relationship in Indigenous health is to be strengthened, health researchers must also engage in the distinctive political processes of ‘recognition’ and ‘reconciliation’. In support of this contention, the processes of recognition and reconciliation are described, and their importance to improving the overall performance, accountability and benefits of Indigenous health research explained.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.ijintrel.2006.09.003
Field of Research 111701 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019457

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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