Cost-efficacy of surgically induced weight loss for the management of type 2 diabetes : a randomized controlled trial

Keating, Catherine L., Dixon, John B., Moodie, Marjory L., Peeters, Anna, Playfair, Julie and O'Brien, Paul E. 2009, Cost-efficacy of surgically induced weight loss for the management of type 2 diabetes : a randomized controlled trial, Diabetes care, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 580-584.

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Title Cost-efficacy of surgically induced weight loss for the management of type 2 diabetes : a randomized controlled trial
Author(s) Keating, Catherine L.
Dixon, John B.
Moodie, Marjory L.
Peeters, Anna
Playfair, Julie
O'Brien, Paul E.
Journal name Diabetes care
Volume number 32
Issue number 4
Start page 580
End page 584
Total pages 5
Publisher American Diabetes Association
Place of publication Alexandria, Va.
Publication date 2009-04
ISSN 0149-5992
1935-5548
Summary OBJECTIVE -- To determine the within-trial cost-efficacy of surgical therapy relative to conventional therapy for achieving remission of recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes in class I and II obese patients.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS -- Efficacy results were derived from a 2-year randomized controlled trial. A health sector perspective was adopted, and within-trial intervention costs included gastric banding surgery, mitigation of complications, outpatient medical consultations, medical investigations, pathology, weight loss therapies, and medication. Resource use was measured based on data drawn from a trial database and patient medical records and valued based on private hospital costs and government schedules in 2006 Australian dollars (AUD). An incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was undertaken.

RESULTS -- Mean 2-year intervention costs per patient were 13,400 AUD for surgical therapy and 3,400 AUD for conventional therapy, with laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) surgery accounting for 85% of the difference. Outpatient medical consultation costs were three times higher for surgical patients, whereas medication costs were 1.5 times higher for conventional patients. The cost differences were primarily in the first 6 months of the trial. Relative to conventional therapy, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for surgical therapy was 16,600 AUD per case of diabetes remitted (currency exchange: 1 AUD = 0.74 USD).

CONCLUSIONS -- Surgical therapy appears to be a cost-effective option for managing type 2 diabetes in class I and II obese patients.
Language eng
Field of Research 140208 Health Economics
Socio Economic Objective 920412 Preventive Medicine
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, American Diabetes Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019484

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Public Health Research, Evaluation, and Policy Cluster
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Created: Wed, 16 Sep 2009, 09:44:47 EST by Sally Morrigan

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