Associations of maternal long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, methyl mercury, and infant development in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study

Strain, JJ, Davidson, Philip W., Bonham, Maxine P, Duffy, Emeir M, Stokes-Riner, Abbie, Thurston, Sally W., Wallace, Julie M.W., Robson, Paula J., Shamlaye, Conrad F., Georger, Lesley A., Sloane-Reeves, Jean, Cernichiari, Elsa, Canfield, Richard L., Cox, Christopher, Huang, Li Shan, Janciuras, Joanne, Myers, Gary J. and Clarkson, Thomas W. 2008, Associations of maternal long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, methyl mercury, and infant development in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study, NeuroToxicology, vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 776-782.

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Title Associations of maternal long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, methyl mercury, and infant development in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study
Author(s) Strain, JJ
Davidson, Philip W.
Bonham, Maxine P
Duffy, Emeir M
Stokes-Riner, Abbie
Thurston, Sally W.
Wallace, Julie M.W.
Robson, Paula J.
Shamlaye, Conrad F.
Georger, Lesley A.
Sloane-Reeves, Jean
Cernichiari, Elsa
Canfield, Richard L.
Cox, Christopher
Huang, Li Shan
Janciuras, Joanne
Myers, Gary J.
Clarkson, Thomas W.
Journal name NeuroToxicology
Volume number 29
Issue number 5
Start page 776
End page 782
Publisher Elservier Ltd.
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publication date 2008-09
ISSN 0161-813X
1872-9711
Keyword(s) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids
prenatal methyl mercury
child development
fish consumption
maternal nutritional status
Seychelles Child Development Study (SCDS)
infant development
methyl mercury exposure
Summary Fish consumption during gestation can provide the fetus with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) and other nutrients essential for growth and development of the brain. However, fish consumption also exposes the fetus to the neurotoxicant, methyl mercury (MeHg). We studied the association between these fetal exposures and early child development in the Seychelles Child Development Nutrition Study (SCDNS). Specifically, we examined a priori models of Ω-3 and Ω-6 LCPUFA measures in maternal serum to test the hypothesis that these LCPUFA families before or after adjusting for prenatal MeHg exposure would reveal associations with child development assessed by the BSID-II at ages 9 and 30 months. There were 229 children with complete outcome and covariate data available for analysis. At 9 months, the PDI was positively associated with total Ω-3 LCPUFA and negatively associated with the ratio of Ω-6/Ω-3 LCPUFA. These associations were stronger in models adjusted for prenatal MeHg exposure. Secondary models suggested that the MeHg effect at 9 months varied by the ratio of Ω-6/Ω-3 LCPUFA. There were no significant associations between LCPUFA measures and the PDI at 30 months. There were significant adverse associations, however, between prenatal MeHg and the 30-month PDI when the LCPUFA measures were included in the regression analysis. The BSID-II mental developmental index (MDI) was not associated with any exposure variable. These data support the potential importance to child development of prenatal availability of Ω-3 LCPUFA present in fish and of LCPUFA in the overall diet. Furthermore, they indicate that the beneficial effects of LCPUFA can obscure the determination of adverse effects of prenatal MeHg exposure in longitudinal observational studies.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2008, Elsevier Inc.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019588

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Created: Thu, 17 Sep 2009, 12:48:46 EST by Lorraine Driscoll

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