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‘To exercise a beneficial influence over a man’ : marriage, gender and the native institutions in early colonial Australia

Cruickshank, Joanna 2008, ‘To exercise a beneficial influence over a man’ : marriage, gender and the native institutions in early colonial Australia. In Barry, Amanda (ed), Evangelists of empire? : missionaries in colonial history, eScholarship Research Centre in collaboration with the School of Historical Studies, Melbourne, Vic., pp.115-124.

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Title ‘To exercise a beneficial influence over a man’ : marriage, gender and the native institutions in early colonial Australia
Author(s) Cruickshank, JoannaORCID iD for Cruickshank, Joanna orcid.org/0000-0001-9155-2625
Title of book Evangelists of empire? : missionaries in colonial history
Editor(s) Barry, Amanda
Publication date 2008
Series History Conference and Seminar series ; 18
Chapter number 10
Total chapters 19
Start page 115
End page 124
Total pages 10
Publisher eScholarship Research Centre in collaboration with the School of Historical Studies
Place of Publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) Imperialism -- Religious aspects
Summary This chapter examines understandings of marriage among missionaries and humanitarians connected with two early colonial ‘Native Institutions’. A comparison of the Parramatta Native Institution in New South Wales and the Albany Native Institution in Western Australia demonstrates that concerns about marriage were central in discussions about the formation and maintenance of these Institutions. Both of these Institutions were established and supported by British evangelicals, who had brought with them to Australia powerful assumptions about gender roles, particularly in
marriage. These assumptions influenced their decisions regarding the children who resided in the Native Institutions. Within specific colonial contexts, however, the assumptions of humanitarians and missionaries did not remain static, and debates over the futures of the Aboriginal children they sought to educate reveal complex and shifting hierarchies of race, gender and class.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 9780734039682
Language eng
Field of Research 220299 History and Philosophy of Specific Fields not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970121 Expanding Knowledge in History and Archaeology
HERDC Research category B1.1 Book chapter
Copyright notice ©2008, University of Melbourne, eScholarship Research Centre in collaboration with the School of History
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019596

Document type: Book Chapter
Collections: School of History, Heritage and Society
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.