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Longitudinal examination of physical and relational aggression as precursors to later problem behaviors in adolescents

Herrenkohl, Todd I., Catalano, Richard F., Hemphill, Sheryl A. and Toumbourou, John W. 2009, Longitudinal examination of physical and relational aggression as precursors to later problem behaviors in adolescents, Violence and victims, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 3-19.

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Title Longitudinal examination of physical and relational aggression as precursors to later problem behaviors in adolescents
Author(s) Herrenkohl, Todd I.
Catalano, Richard F.
Hemphill, Sheryl A.
Toumbourou, John W.ORCID iD for Toumbourou, John W. orcid.org/0000-0002-8431-3762
Journal name Violence and victims
Volume number 24
Issue number 1
Start page 3
End page 19
Total pages 17
Publisher Springer
Place of publication New York, N. Y.
Publication date 2009
ISSN 0886-6708
1945-7073
Keyword(s) physical aggression
relational and indirect aggression
adolescence
substance abuse
depression
self-harm
Summary Research has addressed the consequences of being a victim of physical and relational aggression but less so the consequences of being an aggressor during adolescence. Consequently, relatively little is known about the extent to which aggression in early adolescence increases the risk of later aggression and other psychosocial problems. This study involves a representative sample of seventh- and ninth-grade students from Washington State ( N = 1,942). Students were surveyed on recruitment and then again 1 and 2 years later to learn about ongoing behavior problems, substance use, depression, and self-harm behaviors. Surveys also included measures of several hypothesized promotive factors: attachment to family, school commitment, and academic achievement. Findings suggest that being physically and/or relationally aggressive in grades 7 to 9 increases the risk of aggression and possibly other problem behaviors after accounting for age, gender, race, and a prior measure of each outcome. Independent promotive effects were observed in most analyses, although family attachment appeared a less robust predictor overall. Implications for prevention include acting on the behavior itself and enhancing promotive influences to lessen the risk of agression and other related problems.
Language eng
Field of Research 170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, Springer Publishing Company
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019621

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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Created: Fri, 18 Sep 2009, 09:29:15 EST by Sally Morrigan

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