Assessment of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations in male and female multiple sclerosis patients and control volunteers

Barnes, M.S., Bonham, M.P., Robson, P.J., Strain, JJ, Lowe-Strong, A.S., Eaton-Evans, J, Ginty, F and Wallace, J.M.W 2007, Assessment of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations in male and female multiple sclerosis patients and control volunteers, Multiple Sclerosis: clinical and laboratory research, vol. 13, no. 5, pp. 670-672.

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Title Assessment of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations in male and female multiple sclerosis patients and control volunteers
Author(s) Barnes, M.S.
Bonham, M.P.
Robson, P.J.
Strain, JJ
Lowe-Strong, A.S.
Eaton-Evans, J
Ginty, F
Wallace, J.M.W
Journal name Multiple Sclerosis: clinical and laboratory research
Volume number 13
Issue number 5
Start page 670
End page 672
Publisher Sage Science Press
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2007-06
ISSN 1352-4585
1477-0970
Keyword(s) 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3
25-hydroxyvitamin D
multiple sclerosis
vitamin D
Summary Populations with insufficient ultraviolet exposure and who consume diets low in vitamin D have low vitamin D status (plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations) and a reported higher incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS). The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), is an effective anti-inflammatory molecule. No research to date has assessed 1,25(OH)2D3 concentrations in individuals with MS. In this study, plasma concentrations of 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)2D 3 and parathyroid hormone (PTH) were measured in 29 individuals with MS and 22 age- and sex-matched control volunteers. There were no significant differences in plasma PTH, 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D3 concentrations between individuals with MS and control volunteers. Women with MS had significantly higher 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D3 concentrations than men with MS (79.1 ±45.4 versus 50.2±15.3 nmol/L, P=0.019 and 103.8± 36.8 versus 70.4±28.7 pmol/L, P=0.019, respectively). There was a significant positive correlation between 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D 3 concentrations in all subjects (r=0.564, P=0.000), but secondary analysis revealed that the correlation was driven by women with MS (r=0.677, P= 0.001). Significant sex differences in vitamin D metabolism were observed and were most marked in individuals with MS, suggesting that vitamin D requirements may differ between the sexes, as well as by underlying disease state.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, SAGE Publications
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019629

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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