Challenges of negotiating obesity-related findings with African migrants in Australia : lessons learnt from the African migrant capacity building and performance appraisal project

Renzaho, Andre M. N. 2009, Challenges of negotiating obesity-related findings with African migrants in Australia : lessons learnt from the African migrant capacity building and performance appraisal project, Nutrition and dietetics, vol. 66, no. 3, pp. 145-150.

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Title Challenges of negotiating obesity-related findings with African migrants in Australia : lessons learnt from the African migrant capacity building and performance appraisal project
Author(s) Renzaho, Andre M. N.
Journal name Nutrition and dietetics
Volume number 66
Issue number 3
Start page 145
End page 150
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Place of publication Brisbane, Qld.
Publication date 2009-09
ISSN 1446-6368
1747-0080
Keyword(s) body ideal
culture
obesity
sub-Saharan African migrant child
Summary Aim: To document sub-Saharan African migrants' and teachers' reaction to and acceptance of findings from African Migrant Capacity Building and Performance Appraisal initiative, and to examine the implications for any community-based obesity prevention program.

Methods: Two community forums were organised to discuss the research findings: one with 45 African community leaders from various African communities in Melbourne; and the other with 17 primary and secondary teachers from English Language Schools and Centres across Victoria. The dissemination focused on highlighting the rapid weight gain and obesity risks observed among African migrant children.

Results: Sub-Saharan African migrants' reaction to the findings was that of pride and satisfaction with large body size, seeing it as a job well done, reflecting their perceptions that obesity is not a disease. In addition, they highlighted the intergenerational conflict related to body size ideals between parents and teenage offspring, with the latter preferring model-like Australian body sizes.

Conclusion: Further research is required to examine the association between shifting preferences in body ideals and obesity among traditional communities, such as sub-Saharan African migrants. The understanding of how changes in body image perceptions may influence eating and exercise behaviours among sub-Saharan African migrants would assist in the development of obesity-related preventive interventional programs for this at-risk population.
Language eng
Field of Research 111717 Primary Health Care
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, The Author
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019902

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Public Health Research, Evaluation, and Policy Cluster
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Created: Thu, 24 Sep 2009, 19:59:17 EST by Sally Morrigan

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