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Effectiveness of prevention programmes for obesity and chronic diseases amongst immigrants to developed countries - a systematic review

Renzaho, Andre, Mellor, David, Boulton, Kelly and Swinburn, Boyd 2009, Effectiveness of prevention programmes for obesity and chronic diseases amongst immigrants to developed countries - a systematic review, Public health nutrition, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 438-450, doi: 10.1017/S136898000999111X.

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Title Effectiveness of prevention programmes for obesity and chronic diseases amongst immigrants to developed countries - a systematic review
Author(s) Renzaho, Andre
Mellor, DavidORCID iD for Mellor, David orcid.org/0000-0001-5007-5906
Boulton, Kelly
Swinburn, Boyd
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 13
Issue number 3
Start page 438
End page 450
Total pages 13
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2009-09-02
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) intervention
obesity
diabetes
immigrants
prevention
Summary Objective: To determine whether interventions tailored specifically to  particular immigrant groups from developing to developed countries  decrease the risk of obesity and obesity-related diseases.

Design: Databases searched were MEDLINE (1966–September 2008), CINAHL (1982–September 2008) and PsychINFO (1960–September 2008), as well as Sociological Abstracts, PsychARTICLES, Science Direct, Web of Knowledge and Google Scholar. Studies were included if they were randomised control trials, ‘quasi-randomised’ trials or controlled before-and-after studies. Due to the heterogeneity of study characteristics only a narrative synthesis was undertaken, describing the target population, type and reported impact of the intervention and the effect size.

Results: Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Ten out of thirteen (77 %) studies focused on diabetes, seven (70 %) of which showed significant improvement in addressing diabetes-related behaviours and glycaemic control. The effect on diabetes was greater in culturally tailored and facilitated interventions that encompassed multiple strategies. Six out of the thirteen studies (46 %) incorporated anthropometric data, physical activity and healthy eating as ways to minimise weight gain and diabetes-related outcomes. Of the six interventions that included anthropometric data, only two (33 %) reported improvement in BMI Z-scores, total skinfold thickness or proportion of body fat. Only one in three (33 %) of the studies that included cardiovascular risk factors reported improvement in diastolic blood pressure after adjusting for baseline characteristics. All studies, except four, were of poor quality (small sample size, poor internal consistency of scale, not controlling for baseline characteristics).

Conclusions: Due to the small number of studies included in the present review, the findings that culturally tailored and facilitated interventions produce better outcomes than generalised interventions, and that intervention content is more important than the duration or venue, require further investigation.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S136898000999111X
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, Cambridge University Press
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019903

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Created: Thu, 24 Sep 2009, 20:11:47 EST by Sally Morrigan

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.