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Obesity and pronated foot type may increase the risk of chronic plantar heel pain : a matched case-control study

Irving, Damien B., Cook, Jill L., Young, Mark A. and Menz, Hylton B. 2007, Obesity and pronated foot type may increase the risk of chronic plantar heel pain : a matched case-control study, BMC musculoskeletal disorders, vol. 8, no. 41, pp. 1-8.

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Title Obesity and pronated foot type may increase the risk of chronic plantar heel pain : a matched case-control study
Author(s) Irving, Damien B.
Cook, Jill L.
Young, Mark A.
Menz, Hylton B.
Journal name BMC musculoskeletal disorders
Volume number 8
Issue number 41
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2007
ISSN 1471-2474
Summary Background : Chronic plantar heel pain (CPHP) is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders of the foot, yet its aetiology is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between CPHP and a number of commonly hypothesised causative factors.

Methods :
Eighty participants with CPHP (33 males, 47 females, mean age 52.3 years, S.D. 11.7) were matched by age (± 2 years) and sex to 80 control participants (33 males, 47 females, mean age 51.9 years, S.D. 11.8). The two groups were then compared on body mass index (BMI), foot posture as measured by the Foot Posture Index (FPI), ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) as measured by the Dorsiflexion Lunge Test, occupational lower limb stress using the Occupational Rating Scale and calf endurance using the Standing Heel Rise Test.

Results : Univariate analysis demonstrated that the CPHP group had significantly greater BMI (29.8 ± 5.4 kg/m2 vs. 27.5 ± 4.9 kg/m2; P < 0.01), a more pronated foot posture (FPI score 2.4 ± 3.3 vs. 1.1 ± 2.3; P < 0.01) and greater ankle dorsiflexion ROM (45.1 ± 7.1° vs. 40.5 ± 6.6°; P < 0.01) than the control group. No difference was identified between the groups for calf endurance or time spent sitting, standing, walking on uneven ground, squatting, climbing or lifting. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that those with CPHP were more likely to be obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.4 – 6.1, P < 0.01) and to have a pronated foot posture (FPI ≥ 4) (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.6 – 8.7, P < 0.01).

Conclusion : Obesity and pronated foot posture are associated with CPHP and may be risk factors for the development of the condition. Decreased ankle dorsiflexion, calf endurance and occupational lower limb stress may not play a role in CPHP.
Notes This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Language eng
Field of Research 111104 Public Nutrition Intervention
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2007, Irving et al.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019912

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.