Low-sodium dietary approaches to stop hypertension-type diet including lean red meat lowers blood pressure in postmenopausal women

Nowson, Caryl A, Wattanapenpaiboon, Naiyana and Pachett, Annabelle 2009, Low-sodium dietary approaches to stop hypertension-type diet including lean red meat lowers blood pressure in postmenopausal women, Nutrition research, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 8-18.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Low-sodium dietary approaches to stop hypertension-type diet including lean red meat lowers blood pressure in postmenopausal women
Author(s) Nowson, Caryl A
Wattanapenpaiboon, Naiyana
Pachett, Annabelle
Journal name Nutrition research
Volume number 29
Issue number 1
Start page 8
End page 18
Total pages 11
Publisher Pergamon Press
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2009-01
ISSN 0271-5317
1879-0739
Keyword(s) diet
red meat
sodium
blood pressure
human
Summary Low-sodium Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diets are base producing but restrict red meat without clear justification. We hypothesized that a vitality diet (VD), a low-sodium DASH-type diet with a low dietary acid load containing 6 servings of 100 g cooked lean red meat per week, would be more effective in reducing blood pressure (BP) compared with a higher acid load reference healthy diet (RHD) based on general dietary guidelines to reduce fat intake and increase intake of breads and cereals. A randomized, parallel dietary intervention study was conducted to compare the BP-lowering effect of these 2 diets in postmenopausal women with high/normal BP. Women were randomly assigned to follow either VD or RHD for 14 weeks. Home BP was measured daily with an automated BP monitor under standard conditions. Of 111 women commencing the study, 95 completed (46 VD, 49 RHD). Systolic BP (SBP) throughout the intervention was lower in the VD group compared to the RHD group (repeated-measures analysis of variance time by diet, P = .04), such that at the end of the study, the VD had a fall of SBP by 5.6 ± 1.3 mm Hg (mean ± SEM) compared with a fall of 2.7 ± 1.0 mm Hg in the RHD (group difference, P = .08). When only those taking antihypertensive medications were assessed, the VD (n = 17) had a significant fall of 6.5 ± 2.5 mm Hg SBP (P = .02) and 4.6 ± 1.4 mm Hg diastolic BP (P = .005) after 14 weeks, and their BP was lower than that of the RHD group (n = 18) throughout the study (P < .05). We concluded that a low-sodium DASH diet with a low dietary acid load, which also included lean red meat on most days of the week, was effective in reducing BP in older women, particularly in those taking antihypertensive medications.
Language eng
Field of Research 110201 Cardiology (incl Cardiovascular Diseases)
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970110 Expanding Knowledge in Technology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019913

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 18 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 17 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 500 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 25 Sep 2009, 09:12:53 EST by Deborah Wittahatchy

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.