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Socioeconomic position and children's physical activity and sedentary behaviors : longitudinal findings from the CLAN study

Ball, Kylie, Cleland, Verity J., Timperio, Anna F., Salmon, Jo and Crawford, David A. 2009, Socioeconomic position and children's physical activity and sedentary behaviors : longitudinal findings from the CLAN study, Journal of physical activity and health, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 289-298.

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Title Socioeconomic position and children's physical activity and sedentary behaviors : longitudinal findings from the CLAN study
Author(s) Ball, Kylie
Cleland, Verity J.
Timperio, Anna F.
Salmon, Jo
Crawford, David A.
Journal name Journal of physical activity and health
Volume number 6
Issue number 3
Start page 289
End page 298
Publisher Human Kinetics
Place of publication Champaign, Ill.
Publication date 2009-05
ISSN 1543-5474
1543-3080
Keyword(s) youth
prospective
accelerometer
inequality
behavioral science
Summary Background: This study aimed to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between socioeconomic position (SEP) and physical activity and sedentary behaviors amongst children and adolescents.

Methods: Maternal education was reported by parents of 184 5-6 year-old and 358 10-12 year-old children in 2001. In 2001 and 2004, physical activity was assessed by accelerometry. Older children self-reported and parents of younger children proxy-reported physical activity and television (TV) viewing behaviors. Linear regression was used to predict physical activity and sedentary behaviors, and changes in these behaviors, from maternal education.

Results: Among all children, accelerometer-determined and self/parent-reported moderate and vigorous physical activity declined over three years. Girls of higher SEP demonstrated greater decreases in TV viewing behaviours than those of low SEP. In general, no prospective associations were evident between SEP and objectively-assessed physical activity. A small number of prospective associations were noted between SEP and self-reported physical activity, but these were generally weak and inconsistent in direction.

Conclusions: This study did not find strong evidence that maternal education was cross-sectionally or longitudinally predictive of children’s physical activity or sedentary behaviors. Given the well-documented inverse relationship of SEP with physical activity levels in adult samples, findings suggest that such disparities may emerge after adolescence.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, Human Kinetics
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019928

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.