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Health and mortality consequences of abdominal obesity : evidence from the AusDiab study

Cameron, Adrian J., Dunstan, David W., Owen, Neville, Zimmet, Paul Z., Barr, Elizabeth L. M., Tonkin, Andrew M., Magliano, Dianna J., Murray, Shirley G., Wellborn, Timothy A. and Shaw, Johnathan E. 2009, Health and mortality consequences of abdominal obesity : evidence from the AusDiab study, Medical journal of Australia, vol. 191, no. 4, pp. 202-208.

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Title Health and mortality consequences of abdominal obesity : evidence from the AusDiab study
Author(s) Cameron, Adrian J.
Dunstan, David W.
Owen, Neville
Zimmet, Paul Z.
Barr, Elizabeth L. M.
Tonkin, Andrew M.
Magliano, Dianna J.
Murray, Shirley G.
Wellborn, Timothy A.
Shaw, Johnathan E.
Journal name Medical journal of Australia
Volume number 191
Issue number 4
Start page 202
End page 208
Publisher Australasian Medical Publishing Company
Place of publication Sydney, N.S.W.
Publication date 2009-08-17
ISSN 0025-729X
1326-5377
Summary Objective: To provide an estimate of the morbidity and mortality resulting from abdominal overweight and obesity in the Australian population.

Design and setting:
Prospective, national, population-based study (the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle [AusDiab] study).

Participants:
6072 men and women aged ≥ 25 years at study entry between May 1999 and December 2000, and aged ≤ 75 years, not pregnant and for whom there were waist circumference data at the follow-up survey between June 2004 and December 2005.

Main outcome measures:
Incident health outcomes (type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases) at 5 years and mortality at 8 years. Comparison of outcome measures between those classified as abdominally overweight or obese and those with a normal waist circumference at baseline, and across quintiles of waist circumference, and (for mortality only) waist-to-hip ratio.

Results:
Abdominal obesity was associated with odds ratios of between 2 and 5 for incident type 2 diabetes, dyslipidaemia, hypertension and the metabolic syndrome. The risk of myocardial infarction among obese participants was similarly increased in men (hazard ratio [HR], 2.75; 95% CI, 1.08–7.03), but not women (HR, 1.43; 95% CI, 0.37–5.50). Abdominal obesity-related population attributable fractions for these outcomes ranged from 13% to 47%, and were highest for type 2 diabetes. No significant associations were observed between all-cause mortality and increasing quintiles of abdominal obesity.

Conclusions:
Our findings confirm that abdominal obesity confers a considerably heightened risk for type 2 diabetes, the metabolic syndrome (as well as its components) and cardiovascular disease, and they provide important information that enables a more precise estimate of the burden of disease attributable to obesity in Australia.
Language eng
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, Australasian Medical Publishin Company
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019942

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.