Development and use of a model system to monitor clubroot disease progression with an Australian field collection of Plasmodiophora brassicae

Agarwal, A., Kaul, V. J., Faggian, R. and Cahill, D. M . 2009, Development and use of a model system to monitor clubroot disease progression with an Australian field collection of Plasmodiophora brassicae, Australasian plant pathology, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 120-127.

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Title Development and use of a model system to monitor clubroot disease progression with an Australian field collection of Plasmodiophora brassicae
Formatted title Development and use of a model system to monitor clubroot disease progression with an Australian field collection of Plasmodiophora brassicae
Author(s) Agarwal, A.
Kaul, V. J.
Faggian, R.
Cahill, D. M .
Journal name Australasian plant pathology
Volume number 38
Issue number 2
Start page 120
End page 127
Total pages 8
Publisher Australasian Plant Pathology Society
Place of publication [Adelaide, S. Aust]
Publication date 2009-02
ISSN 0815-3191
1448-6032
Summary A modified sand–liquid culture method facilitated easy visualisation of the primary life cycle stages of Plasmodiophora brassicae within clean root hairs of the Arabidopsis host. Pathogen penetration occurred from day 4 onwards and then primary plasmodia developed within the host root. Several Arabidopsis ecotypes tested in varying growth conditions showed differences in disease expression. Defined growth cabinet conditions were found most suitable for studying disease progression in the ecotypes and for achieving uniform infection and disease development. Arabidopsis ecotypes Ta-0 and Tsu-0 known to be partially resistant to a German single-spore isolate of P. brassicae were susceptible to an Australian (Victorian) field population of P. brassicae. The European clubroot differential test was used to confirm virulence and describe the pathotype of the Victorian field population. Knowledge of the interaction of an Australian population of P. brassicae with its host will provide valuable information on a disease which is very difficult to control.
Language eng
Field of Research 050299 Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30019958

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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