Public satisfaction with police : the importance of procedural justice and police performance in police-citizen encounters

Murphy, Kristina 2009, Public satisfaction with police : the importance of procedural justice and police performance in police-citizen encounters, Australian and New Zealand journal of criminology, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 159-178.

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Title Public satisfaction with police : the importance of procedural justice and police performance in police-citizen encounters
Author(s) Murphy, Kristina
Journal name Australian and New Zealand journal of criminology
Volume number 42
Issue number 2
Start page 159
End page 178
Publisher Australian Academic Press
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2009
ISSN 0004-8658
1837-9273
Summary A large body of literature has demonstrated that when authorities use procedural justice with those they regulate, people will be more satisfied with those authorities and will be more willing to cooperate and comply with their directions and rules. In the context of policing, procedural justice has also been shown to be important for shaping citizens’ views about police legitimacy, their satisfaction with police and also in fostering cooperation with police. What remains largely unexamined, however, is whether the positive effect of procedural justice varies across different types of police–citizen encounters. Using survey data collected from a national sample of 1,462 Australians, the present study will examine the relative importance of procedural justice on overall ratings of police satisfaction across two types of police–citizen encounters (citizen-initiated contacts and police-initiated contacts). It will be shown that procedural justice is most important in police-initiated contacts, while police performance is most important in citizen-initiated contacts.
Language eng
Field of Research 180119 Law and Society
Socio Economic Objective 940499 Justice and the Law not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020019

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
School of History, Heritage and Society
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