Nurturing regulatory compliance: Is procedural justice effective when people question the legitimacy of the law?

Murphy, Kristina, Tyler, Tom R. and Curtis, Amy 2009, Nurturing regulatory compliance: Is procedural justice effective when people question the legitimacy of the law?, Regulation & governance, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 1-26.

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Title Nurturing regulatory compliance: Is procedural justice effective when people question the legitimacy of the law?
Author(s) Murphy, Kristina
Tyler, Tom R.
Curtis, Amy
Journal name Regulation & governance
Volume number 3
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 26
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Place of publication Carlton, Vic.
Publication date 2009
ISSN 1748-5983
1748-5991
Keyword(s) compliance
legitimacy
motivational postures
procedural justice
regulation
Summary Procedural justice generally enhances an authority's legitimacy and encourages people to comply with an authority's decisions and rules. We argue, however, that previous research on procedural justice and legitimacy has examined legitimacy in a limited way by focusing solely on the perceived legitimacy of authorities and ignoring how people may perceive the legitimacy of the laws and rules they enforce. In addition, no research to date has examined how such perceptions of legitimacy may moderate the effect of procedural justice on compliance behavior. Using survey data collected across three different regulatory contexts – taxation (Study 1), social security (Study 2), and law enforcement (Study 3) – the findings suggest that one's perceptions of the legitimacy of the law moderates the effect of procedural justice on compliance behaviors; procedural justice is more important for shaping compliance behaviors when people question the legitimacy of the laws than when they accept them as legitimate. An explanation of these findings using a social distancing framework is offered, along with a discussion of the implications the findings have on enforcement.
Language eng
Field of Research 180119 Law and Society
Socio Economic Objective 940499 Justice and the Law not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020034

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
School of History, Heritage and Society
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