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Children's takeaway and fast-food intakes: associations with the neighbourhood food intakes : associations with the neighbourhood food environment

Timperio, Anna F, Ball, Kylie, Roberts, Rebecca, Adrianopoulos, Nick and Crawford, David A 2009, Children's takeaway and fast-food intakes: associations with the neighbourhood food intakes : associations with the neighbourhood food environment, Public health nutrition, vol. 12, no. 10, pp. 1960-1964.

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Title Children's takeaway and fast-food intakes: associations with the neighbourhood food intakes : associations with the neighbourhood food environment
Author(s) Timperio, Anna F
Ball, Kylie
Roberts, Rebecca
Adrianopoulos, Nick
Crawford, David A
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 12
Issue number 10
Start page 1960
End page 1964
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2009-10
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) children
neighbourhood environment
fast food
diet
Summary Objective: The present study aimed to examine associations between availability of outlets where takeaway or fast food could be purchased and consumption of takeaway or fast food among children.

Design Cross-sectional:
Parents completed a questionnaire regarding the frequency per week their child usually ate takeaway or fast foods. The availability of outlets where these foods could be purchased close to home and en route to school was determined with a Geographic Information System (presence of any outlets and density of outlets within 800 m from home and along the route to school, and distance from home to closest outlet).

Setting: Greater Melbourne and Geelong, Australia.

Subjects: Three hundred and fifty-three children aged 5–6 years and 463 children aged 10–12 years.

Results: Overall, 69·4 % of children consumed takeaway or fast foods once weekly or more often. Only one measure of availability of outlets close to home was associated with consumption; each additional outlet within 800 m was associated with 3 % lower odds of consuming takeaway or fast foods at least once weekly (OR = 0·97, 95 % CI 0·95, 1·00). There were no associations between availability en route to school and the likelihood of consuming takeaway or fast food at least once weekly.

Conclusions:
  Access to outlets where takeaway or fast food could be purchased did not predict frequency of consumption of takeaway or fast food in the expected direction. Such relationships appear to be complex and may not be adequately captured by the measures of access included in the current study.
Language eng
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020106

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.