The invisible part-time research students : a case study of satisfaction and completion

Rodwell, John and Neuman, Ruth 2009, The invisible part-time research students : a case study of satisfaction and completion, Studies in higher education, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 55-68.

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Title The invisible part-time research students : a case study of satisfaction and completion
Author(s) Rodwell, John
Neuman, Ruth
Journal name Studies in higher education
Volume number 34
Issue number 1
Start page 55
End page 68
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication [Abingdon, Oxfordshire]
Publication date 2009-02
ISSN 0307-5079
1470-174X
Summary Internationally, the attention being paid by governments to research education is growing in line with the increasing numbers of students undertaking research degrees. With this emphasis on research students it is, however, becoming clear that there is a specific category of research student that has been overlooked to the point that they are 'invisible', in both policy and research terms: part-time students. This article addresses this gap by presenting an analysis of the satisfaction of Australian part-time research graduates, and a case study of predictors of their completion. The Australian example provides valuable lessons that can impact on the changes and features of research student programs in other countries. Part-time doctoral students were found to have faster completion times than full-time doctoral students, in equivalent-time terms. In terms of satisfaction with their student experience, part-time research graduates are less satisfied with the infrastructure support provided, and have a less favourable perception of the research climate of their department, than full-time research students. More specifically, the analyses in the case study highlight the varying issues and demands that are the best predictors of time to completion by mode of study for doctoral students. Internationally, the attention being paid by governments to research education is growing in line with the increasing numbers of students undertaking research degrees. With this emphasis on research students it is, however, becoming clear that there is a specific category of research student that has been overlooked to the point that they are 'invisible', in both policy and research terms: part-time students. This article addresses this gap by presenting an analysis of the satisfaction of Australian part-time research graduates, and a case study of predictors of their completion. The Australian example provides valuable lessons that can impact on the changes and features of research student programs in other countries. Part-time doctoral students were found to have faster completion times than full-time doctoral students, in equivalent-time terms. In terms of satisfaction with their student experience, part-time research graduates are less satisfied with the infrastructure support provided, and have a less favourable perception of the research climate of their department, than full-time research students. More specifically, the analyses in the case study highlight the varying issues and demands that are the best predictors of time to completion by mode of study for doctoral students.
Language eng
Field of Research 130213 Vocational Education and Training Curriculum and Pedagogy
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, Society for Research into Higher Education
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020124

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Deakin Graduate School of Business
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