Is sex-specific mass gain in Cory's shearwaters Calonectris diomedea related to begging and steroid hormone expression?

Quillfeldt, Petra, Träger, Inga, Griffith, Kate, Buchanan, Katherine L. and Masello, Juan F. 2007, Is sex-specific mass gain in Cory's shearwaters Calonectris diomedea related to begging and steroid hormone expression?, Behavioral ecology and sociobiology, vol. 61, no. 5, pp. 793-800.


Title Is sex-specific mass gain in Cory's shearwaters Calonectris diomedea related to begging and steroid hormone expression?
Author(s) Quillfeldt, Petra
Träger, Inga
Griffith, Kate
Buchanan, Katherine L.
Masello, Juan F.
Journal name Behavioral ecology and sociobiology
Volume number 61
Issue number 5
Start page 793
End page 800
Publisher Springer Berlin / Heidelberg
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2007-03
ISSN 0340-5443
1432-0762
Keyword(s) parent–offspring communication
size dimorphism
behavioural sex differences
signalling
procellariiformes
Summary Mass differences between the sexes of dimorphic bird species often appear early in the nestling development. But how do adults know how much to feed a chick in a sexually dimorphic species? Do chicks of the heavier sex beg more? We studied begging in Cory’s shearwaters Calonectris diomedea, a species with heavier adult and juvenile males than females. We found that begging rates and call numbers were not different between male and female chicks, but parameters of begging intensity differed between the sexes in their relationship to chick body condition. For the same body condition, males had significantly higher begging call numbers and rates. Acoustical parameters, which were analysed semi-automatically, included the lengths of call and silence intervals, the minimum, mean and maximum frequency in a call and the number of frequency peaks within a call. We found no consistent differences of acoustic begging call elements between the sexes. Male and female chicks did not differ in the levels of the steroid hormones testosterone or corticosterone in the second quarter of the nestling period, and the mechanism leading to sex-related differences in begging rates for a given body condition remains unknown.
Language eng
Field of Research 060399 Evolutionary Biology not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Springer-Verlag
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020158

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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