Justice, gender and employee cognitive outcomes

Jepsen, Denise M. and Rodwell, John J. 2009, Justice, gender and employee cognitive outcomes, in IOP 2009 : Meeting the future : promoting sustainable organisational growth : proceedings of the Industrial and Organisational Psychology Conference, Australian Psychological Society, [Sydney, N.S.W.], pp. 80-84.

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Title Justice, gender and employee cognitive outcomes
Author(s) Jepsen, Denise M.
Rodwell, John J.
Conference name Industrial and Organisational Psychology Conference (8th : 2009 : Manly Beach, New South Wales)
Conference location Manly Beach, N.S.W.
Conference dates 25-28 June, 2009
Title of proceedings IOP 2009 : Meeting the future : promoting sustainable organisational growth : proceedings of the Industrial and Organisational Psychology Conference
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2009
Conference series Industrial and Organisational Psychology Conference
Start page 80
End page 84
Publisher Australian Psychological Society
Place of publication [Sydney, N.S.W.]
Summary This study used the four factor model of organizational justice to investigate gender differences in the employee outcome cognitive variables of job satisfaction,commitment and turnover intentions. Survey respondents were 301 male and 147 female currently working employees in a variety of occupations. Structural equation modeling was used for the analyses. There were significant relationships from distributive justice to job satisfaction and commitment for both men and women. Informational justice significantly predicted job satisfaction. For women, informational justice predicted commitment and turnover intentions. Procedural justice predicted turnover intentions and interpersonal justice predicted commitment for men. Gender differences were found for procedural, interpersonal and informational justices. Men and women gave differing responses to justice perceptions, implying consideration of a range of views when allocation decisions are made and communicated. For both genders, distributive and informational justices play a central role in predicting employee outcomes, although the other justice types also have an effect for males. Justice had a diffuse effect for males, but not females.
ISBN 9780909881399
Language eng
Field of Research 150399 Business and Management not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, Australian Psychological Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020213

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Deakin Graduate School of Business
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