You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Barriers to learners' successful completion of VET flexible delivery programs

Grace, Lauri 2001, Barriers to learners' successful completion of VET flexible delivery programs, in Research to reality : putting VET research to work : 4th Australian VET Research Association Conference, Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association, Alexandria, N.S.W..

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
grace-barrierstolearners-2001.pdf Published version application/pdf 50.20KB 225

Title Barriers to learners' successful completion of VET flexible delivery programs
Author(s) Grace, Lauri
Conference name Australian VET Research Association. Conference (4th : 2001 : Adelaide, S. Aust.)
Conference location Adelaide, S. Aust.
Conference dates 28-30 March 2001
Title of proceedings Research to reality : putting VET research to work : 4th Australian VET Research Association Conference
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2001
Conference series Australian VET Research Association Conference
Publisher Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association
Place of publication Alexandria, N.S.W.
Summary In the early 1990s, Australian policymakers began explicitly promoting increased use of flexible delivery in vocational education and training (VET). Some researchers argued that many students lack the learning skills required to deal with the unique demands of flexible delivery. Concerns were also raised about the VET sector's capacity to help students develop needed cognitive and metacognitive skills. A review of the literature revealed wide agreement that students' success in flexible delivery and open and distance education in Australia and elsewhere is generally determined by a complex interplay of factors, including the following: readiness for self-directed learning; ability to balance the time demands of study with other commitments such as family and work; level of literacy; ability to understand and deal with assessment requirements; level of motivation; and previous educational experiences. Two case studies based on the actual experiences of two of six students interviewed about their experiences in flexible VET delivery were reviewed. Both students decided to withdraw from their VET course because of several interconnected factors that built up over time. Both cases illustrated that some problems that can be addressed quickly in face-to-face learning environments are much more difficult to resolve when students are off campus.
Language eng
Field of Research 139999 Education not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020231

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Social and Cultural Studies in Education
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 490 Abstract Views, 225 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 01 Oct 2009, 09:49:08 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.