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The impact of living environment on satisfaction with social relationships upon commencing university

O'Connor, Elodie J., Staiger, Petra K. and Chambers, Susan 2007, The impact of living environment on satisfaction with social relationships upon commencing university, in Generations of relationships and relationships across generations : Combined 7th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society's Psychology of Relationships Interest Group and International Association for Relationship Research Mini-conference, Australian Psychological Society, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 94-99.

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Title The impact of living environment on satisfaction with social relationships upon commencing university
Author(s) O'Connor, Elodie J.
Staiger, Petra K.ORCID iD for Staiger, Petra K. orcid.org/0000-0002-6968-5015
Chambers, Susan
Conference name Australian Psychological Society. Conference (7th : 2007 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 10-11 November 2007
Title of proceedings Generations of relationships and relationships across generations : Combined 7th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society's Psychology of Relationships Interest Group and International Association for Relationship Research Mini-conference
Editor(s) Pearce, Zoe J.
Publication date 2007
Conference series Australian Psychological Society Conference
Start page 94
End page 99
Total pages 6
Publisher Australian Psychological Society
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary Making the transition to university is a significant life event for many young people. It is believed that strong social relationships can help make this transition more successful. In this study, 201 full-time, first year university students completed a survey in order to examine whether those students who remained living with their parents differed on a range of social relationship variables compared to those who lived on-campus or off-campus independently from their parents. Results revealed that students living independently off-campus reported significantly lower satisfaction with their living environment and opportunities to make new friends at university, as well as significantly higher levels of depression, and higher levels of loneliness which approached significance. These findings indicate that universities may need to focus more attention on this particular sub-group, in an attempt to increase the successful transition of students from high school to university. Future research could endeavour to develop strategies for increasing university students' social relationships and support networks.
ISBN 9780909881351
0909881359
Language eng
Field of Research 170103 Educational Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020246

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Psychology
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