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A comparison of methods to calculate the optimal load for maximal power output in the power clean

Burnett, Angus, Beard, Adam, Newton, Robert and Netto, Kevin 2004, A comparison of methods to calculate the optimal load for maximal power output in the power clean, in ISBS 2004 : Proceedings of XXII International Symposium of Biomechanics in Sports, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont., pp. 434-437.

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Title A comparison of methods to calculate the optimal load for maximal power output in the power clean
Author(s) Burnett, Angus
Beard, Adam
Newton, Robert
Netto, Kevin
Conference name International Symposium of Biomechanics in Sports (22nd : 2004 : Ottawa, Canada)
Conference location University of Ottawa, Canada
Conference dates 9-12 August, 2004
Title of proceedings ISBS 2004 : Proceedings of XXII International Symposium of Biomechanics in Sports
Editor(s) Lamotagne, Mario
Robertson, D. Gordon E.
Sveistrup, Heidi
Publication date 2004
Conference series Biomechanics in Sports Symposium
Start page 434
End page 437
Total pages xx, 627 p.
Publisher University of Ottawa
Place of publication Ottawa, Ont.
Keyword(s) power output
power clean
methods
optimal load
Summary The aim of this study was to compare three calculation methods to determine the load that maximises power output in the power clean. Five male athletes (height=179.8 10.5cms, weight 91 .8 8.8kg, power dean 1RM = 117.0 20.5kg) performed two per cleans at 10% increments from 50% to 100% of 1RM. Bar displacement data was collected using a Ballistic Measurement System (BMS) and vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) data was measured by a Kistler 9287B Force Plate. Power output was calculated for BMS (system mass), BMS (bar mass) and VGRF/BMS system mass. Optimal load was determined to be 70% for the BMS (system mass) and VGRF BMS (system mass) methods and 90% for the BMS (bar mass) method. Sports scientists should be aware of the technical issues underlying these findings due to the practical ramifications for athlete testing and training.
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ISBN 0889273189
9780889273184
ISSN 1999-4168
Language eng
Field of Research 110601 Biomechanics
Socio Economic Objective 970109 Expanding Knowledge in Engineering
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2004,University of Ottawa
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020318

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.