Cortical and trabecular bone at the forearm show different adaptation patterns in response to tennis playing

Ducher, Gaele, Prouteau, Stephanie, Courteix, Daniel and Benhamou, Claude-Laurent 2004, Cortical and trabecular bone at the forearm show different adaptation patterns in response to tennis playing, Journal of clinical densitometry, vol. 7, no. 4, Winter, pp. 399-405.


Title Cortical and trabecular bone at the forearm show different adaptation patterns in response to tennis playing
Author(s) Ducher, Gaele
Prouteau, Stephanie
Courteix, Daniel
Benhamou, Claude-Laurent
Journal name Journal of clinical densitometry
Volume number 7
Issue number 4
Season Winter
Start page 399
End page 405
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2004
ISSN 1094-6950
1559-0747
Keyword(s) bone geometry
trabecular and cortical adaptations
tennis players
bone mineral density
Summary Bone responds to impact-loading activity by increasing its size and/or density. The aim of this study was to compare the magnitude and modality of the bone response between cortical and trabecular bone in the forearms of tennis players. Bone area, bone mineral content (BMC), and bone mineral density (BMD) of the ulna and radius were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 57 players (24.5 ± 5.7 yr old), at three sites: the ultradistal region (50% trabecular bone), the mid-distal regions, and third-distal (mainly cortical bone). At the ultradistal radius, the side-to-side difference in BMD was larger than in bone area (8.4 ± 5.2% and 4.9 ± 4.0%, respectively, p < 0.01). In the cortical sites, the asymmetry was lower (p < 0.01) in BMD than in bone area (mid-distal radius: 4.0 ± 4.3% vs 11.7 ± 6.8%; third-distal radius: 5.0 ± 4.8% vs 8.4 ± 6.2%). The asymmetry in bone area explained 33% of the variance of the asymmetry in BMC at the ultradistal radius, 66% at the mid-distal radius, and 53% at the third-distal radius. The ulna displayed similar results. Cortical and trabecular bone seem to respond differently to mechanical loading. The first one mainly increases its size, whereas the second one preferentially increases its density.
Language eng
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, International Society for Clinical Densitometry
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020379

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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