Postural neck pain : an investigation of habitual sitting posture, perception of 'good' posture and cervicothoracic kinaesthesia

Edmondston, Stephen J., Chan, Hon Yan, Ngai, Gorman Chi Wing, Warren, M. Linda R., Williams, Jonathan M., Glennon, Susan and Netto, Kevin 2007, Postural neck pain : an investigation of habitual sitting posture, perception of 'good' posture and cervicothoracic kinaesthesia, Manual therapy, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 363-371.

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Title Postural neck pain : an investigation of habitual sitting posture, perception of 'good' posture and cervicothoracic kinaesthesia
Author(s) Edmondston, Stephen J.
Chan, Hon Yan
Ngai, Gorman Chi Wing
Warren, M. Linda R.
Williams, Jonathan M.
Glennon, Susan
Netto, Kevin
Journal name Manual therapy
Volume number 12
Issue number 4
Start page 363
End page 371
Publisher Churchill Livingstone
Place of publication Edinburgh, Scotland
Publication date 2007-11
ISSN 1356-689X
1532-2769
Keyword(s) posture
pain
kinaesthesia
cervico-thoracic
Summary Impairments of cervico-cephalic kinaesthesia and habitual forward head posture have been considered important in the aetiology of postural neck pain, yet these factors have not been specifically examined in a homogeneous clinical population. The objective of this study was to compare the habitual sitting posture (HSP), perception of good posture and postural repositioning error (PRE) of the cervico-thoracic (CT) spine in individuals with postural neck pain, with a matched group of asymptomatic subjects. Twenty-one subjects with postural neck pain and 22 asymptomatic control subjects were recruited into the study. An optical motion analysis system was used to measure the HSP and perceived ‘good’ sitting posture. PRE was measured over six trials where the subject attempted to replicate their self-selected ‘good’ posture. There was no difference between the groups in the HSP but significant differences were identified in the perception of ‘good’ posture. Posture repositioning error was higher for the head posture variables than for CT and shoulder girdle variables in both groups. However, there was no significant difference in posture repositioning error between groups for any of the posture measures. The findings suggest that individuals with postural neck pain may have a different perception of ‘good’ posture, but no significant difference in HSP or kinaesthetic sensibility compared with matched asymptomatic subjects.
Language eng
Field of Research 110601 Biomechanics
Socio Economic Objective 970109 Expanding Knowledge in Engineering
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2006, Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020382

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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