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Having a baby in the new land : a qualitative exploration of the experiences of Asian migrants in rural Tasmania, Australia

Hoang, Ha, Le, Quynh and Kilpatrick, Sue 2009, Having a baby in the new land : a qualitative exploration of the experiences of Asian migrants in rural Tasmania, Australia, Rural and remote health, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 1-13.

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Title Having a baby in the new land : a qualitative exploration of the experiences of Asian migrants in rural Tasmania, Australia
Author(s) Hoang, Ha
Le, Quynh
Kilpatrick, Sue
Journal name Rural and remote health
Volume number 9
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 13
Publisher Greater Green Triangle University Department of Rural Health
Place of publication [Adelaide, S. Aust.]
Publication date 2009
ISSN 1445-6354
Keyword(s) acculturation
Asian women
Australia
child birth
cultural diversity
health services for migrants
maternity care
reproductive health
rural health context
Summary Introduction: Australia is a land of cultural diversity. Cultural differences in maternity care may result in conflict between migrants and healthcare providers, especially when migrants have minimal English language knowledge. The aim of the study was to investigate Asian migrant women’s child-birth experiences in a rural Australian context.

Method: The study consisted of semi-structured interviews conducted with 10 Asian migrant women living in rural Tasmania to explore their childbirth experiences and the barriers they faced in accessing maternal care in the new land. The data were analysed using grounded theory and three main categories were identified: ‘migrants with traditional practices in the new land’, ‘support and postnatal experiences’ and ‘barriers to accessing maternal care’.

Results: The findings revealed that Asian migrants in Tasmania faced language and cultural barriers when dealing with the new healthcare system. Because some Asian migrants retain traditional views and practices for maternity care, confusion and conflicting expectations may occur. Family and community play an important role in supporting migrant women through their maternity care.

Conclusions: Providing interpreting services, social support for migrant women and improving the cross-cultural training for healthcare providers were recommended to improve available maternal care services.

Language eng
Field of Research 130199 Education systems not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020388

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Vice-Chancellor and Presidents Office
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Created: Wed, 07 Oct 2009, 14:53:47 EST

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