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Improving the uptake of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD : qualitative study of experiences and attitudes

Harris, David, Hayter, Mark and Allender, Steven 2008, Improving the uptake of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD : qualitative study of experiences and attitudes, British journal of general practice, vol. 58, no. 555, pp. 703-710.

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Title Improving the uptake of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD : qualitative study of experiences and attitudes
Author(s) Harris, David
Hayter, Mark
Allender, Steven
Journal name British journal of general practice
Volume number 58
Issue number 555
Start page 703
End page 710
Total pages 8
Publisher Royal College of General Practitioners
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2008-10-01
ISSN 0960-1643
1478-5242
Keyword(s) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
communication barriers
patient acceptance of healthcare
qualitative research
Summary Background
Pulmonary rehabilitation can improve the quality of life and ability to function of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It may also reduce hospital admission and inpatient stay with exacerbations of COPD. Some patients who are eligible for pulmonary rehabilitation may not accept an offer of it, thereby missing an opportunity to improve their health status.

Aim
To identify a strategy for improving the uptake of pulmonary rehabilitation.

Design of study
Qualitative interviews with patients.

Setting
Patients with COPD were recruited from a suburban general practice in north-east Derbyshire, UK.

Method
In-depth interviews were conducted on a purposive sample of 16 patients with COPD to assess their concerns about accepting an offer of pulmonary rehabilitation. Interviews were analysed using grounded theory.

Results
Fear of breathlessness and exercise, and the effect of pulmonary rehabilitation on coexisting medical problems were the most common concerns patients had about taking part in the rehabilitation. The possibility of reducing the sensation of breathlessness and regaining the ability to do things, such as play with their grandchildren, were motivators to participating.

Conclusion
A model is proposed where patients who feel a loss of control as their disease advances may find that pulmonary rehabilitation offers them the opportunity to regain control. Acknowledging patients' fears and framing pulmonary rehabilitation as a way of ‘regaining control’ may improve patient uptake.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2008
Copyright notice ©2008, British Journal of General Practice
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020478

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.