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Coronary heart disease trends in England and Wales from 1984 to 2004 : concealed levelling of mortality rates among young adults

O'Flaherty, M., Ford, E., Allender, Steven, Scarborough, Peter and Capewell, Simon 2008, Coronary heart disease trends in England and Wales from 1984 to 2004 : concealed levelling of mortality rates among young adults, Heart, vol. 94, no. 2, pp. 178-181.

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Title Coronary heart disease trends in England and Wales from 1984 to 2004 : concealed levelling of mortality rates among young adults
Author(s) O'Flaherty, M.
Ford, E.
Allender, Steven
Scarborough, Peter
Capewell, Simon
Journal name Heart
Volume number 94
Issue number 2
Start page 178
End page 181
Publisher [BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & British Cardiovascular Society]
Place of publication [London, UK]
Publication date 2008
ISSN 1355-6037
1468-201X
Summary Background: Trends in cardiovascular risk factors among UK adults present a complex picture. Ominous increases in obesity and diabetes among young adults raise concerns about subsequent coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates in this group.

Objective: To examine recent trends in age-specific mortality rates from CHD, particularly those among younger adults.

Methods and results: Mortality data from 1984 to 2004 were used to calculate age-specific mortality rates for British adults aged 35+ years, and joinpoint regression was used to assess changes in trends. Overall, the age-adjusted mortality rate decreased by 54.7% in men and by 48.3% in women. However, among men aged 35–44 years, CHD mortality rates in 2002 increased for the first time in over two decades. Furthermore, the recent declines in CHD mortality rates seem to be slowing in both men and women aged 45–54. Among older adults, however, mortality rates continued to decrease steadily throughout the period.

Conclusions: The flattening mortality rates for CHD among younger adults may represent a sentinel event. Deteriorations in medical management of CHD appear implausible. Thus, unfavourable trends in risk factors for CHD, specifically obesity and diabetes, provide the most likely explanation for the observed trends.
Notes This article has been published in the BMJ, O'Flaherty, M., Ford, E., Allender, Steven, Scarborough, Peter and Capewell, Simon 2008, Coronary heart disease trends in England and Wales from 1984 to 2004 : concealed levelling of mortality rates among young adults, Heart, vol. 94, no. 2, pp. 178-181, and can also be viewed on the journal’s website at www.bmj.com
Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & British Cardiovascular Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020483

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.