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Effective anger intervention for indigenous prisoners : research and development in a South Australian study

Day, Andrew, Howells, Kevin and Davey, Linda 2006, Effective anger intervention for indigenous prisoners : research and development in a South Australian study, in IAFMHS 2006 : A safe society : effective assessment, prevention and treatment in forensic mental health : Proceedings of the 6th International Association of Forensic Mental Health Services Conference, IAFMHS, [Amsterdam, The Netherlands].

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Title Effective anger intervention for indigenous prisoners : research and development in a South Australian study
Author(s) Day, Andrew
Howells, Kevin
Davey, Linda
Conference name International Association of Forensic Mental Health Services. Conference (6th : 2006 : Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
Conference location Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Conference dates 14-16 June, 2006
Title of proceedings IAFMHS 2006 : A safe society : effective assessment, prevention and treatment in forensic mental health : Proceedings of the 6th International Association of Forensic Mental Health Services Conference
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2006
Conference series International Association of Forensic Mental Health Services Conference
Publisher IAFMHS
Place of publication [Amsterdam, The Netherlands]
Summary Although the need for the development and provision of culturally appropriate rehabilitation programs for offenders is widely acknowledged, there is a lack of empirical data that can be used as the basis for the development of new programs. This paper reports the findings of two studies - first a qualitiative study exploring the meaning of anger for Indigenous men in prison; and second a comparison of Indigenous and non-Indigenous male prisoners on a range of measures relevant to the experience of anger by indigenous prisoners in Australia. The results suggest that Indigenous participants are more likely to experience symptoms of early trauma, have greater difficulties identifying and describing feelings and perceive higher levels of discrimination than non-Indigenous prisoners. The implications of this work for the development of culturally appropriate and effective anger management programs for indigenous male prisoners and those from other imnoirty cultural groups are discussed.
Language eng
Field of Research 170113 Social and Community Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2006, IAFMHS
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020585

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Psychology
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