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Changing violent behaviour : forensic mental health and criminological models compared

Howells, Kevin, Day, Andrew and Thomas-Peter, Brian 2004, Changing violent behaviour : forensic mental health and criminological models compared, Journal of forensic psychiatry and psychology, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 391-406, doi: 10.1080/14788940410001655907.

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Title Changing violent behaviour : forensic mental health and criminological models compared
Author(s) Howells, Kevin
Day, Andrew
Thomas-Peter, Brian
Journal name Journal of forensic psychiatry and psychology
Volume number 15
Issue number 3
Start page 391
End page 406
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Abingdon, England
Publication date 2004-09
ISSN 1478-9949
1478-9957
Keyword(s) violence
rehabilitation
treatment
offenders
Summary Evidence-based interventions designed to reduce the risk of re-offending, particularly violent re-offending, are commonly offered in correctional systems around the world. The interventions are often based upon the application of several principles of service delivery that have become widely known as the 'what works' approach to offender rehabilitation. The applicability of these principles to forensic psychiatric services has yet to be determined. The aims are to examine the possible application of the 'what works' approach and its implications for forensic mental health practice. The method used was a review of relevant research from both the general offender and forensic psychiatry literature. The principles underlying the 'what works' approach are likely to have utility in service delivery in forensic psychiatry, particularly when a treatment target is a reduction in risk of harm to others. The individualized models of patient care practiced in forensic psychiatry are also likely to have utility in improving treatment outcomes in correctional settings. The conclusion is that an increased interchange of ideas and interventions between the two areas of practice is likely to be of mutual benefit. This is an area that requires significant development.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/14788940410001655907
Field of Research 170104 Forensic Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2004, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020620

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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