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Architecture, multiculturalism and cultural sustainability in Australian cities

Beynon, David 2009, Architecture, multiculturalism and cultural sustainability in Australian cities, International journal of environmental, cultural, economic & social sustainability, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 45-58.

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Title Architecture, multiculturalism and cultural sustainability in Australian cities
Formatted title Reproduced with kind permission of the copyright owner. Readers must contact Common Ground publishing for permission to reproduce this article.
Author(s) Beynon, David
Journal name International journal of environmental, cultural, economic & social sustainability
Volume number 5
Issue number 2
Start page 45
End page 58
Publisher Common Ground Publishing Pty Ltd
Place of publication Altona, Vic.
Publication date 2009
ISSN 1832-2077
Keyword(s) architecture
built environment
migration
multiculturalism
urban culture
cultural heritage
Summary The way that the built environment represents and accommodates people of different cultures is an important facet of developing a holistically sustainable future. Architecture intervenes, maps and signifies and in doing so it constructs identities. It helps to shape how we know the world by mediating power, social relations and cultural values. Events such as the settlement, inhabitation and establishment of diasporic communities involve the occupation of space. Architecture provides the armature of this space, its form and its image. Building is a potent means by which identity can be formed. A most significant part of people’s well-being and capacity is their participation in literally building communities. This paper will illustrate this issue through discussion of contemporary Australian cities. The buildings of a wide variety of immigrants to Australia have since the 1950s contributed greatly to the changing nature of its cities. They are the physical manifestation of the great demographic changes that have occurred across the nation during this period. The combination of people of different backgrounds and cultures lends a unique quality to Australian built environments, and this needs not only be understood but celebrated, as they are contributing to the development of Australian urban culture. Increased knowledge and understanding of the impact of immigration and multiculturalism on our built environment will add substantially to understanding of the diversity of Australia’s cultural heritage, and the potential of future planners, architects, and members of the general public to create inclusive and dynamic Australian cities.
Notes Reproduced with kind permission of the copyright owner. Readers must contact Common Ground publishing for permission to reproduce this article.
Language eng
Field of Research 120101 Architectural Design
Socio Economic Objective 870299 Construction Design not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, Common Ground
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020628

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.