Contrasting longitudinal and cross-sectional relationships between insulin resistance and percentage of body fat, fitness, and physical activity in children—the LOOK study

Telford, Richard D., Cunningham, Ross B., Shaw, Jonathan E., Dunstan, David W., Lafferty, Antony R. A., Reynolds, Graham J., Hickman, Peter E., Southcott, Emma, Potter, Julia M., Waring, Paul and Telford, Rohan M. 2009, Contrasting longitudinal and cross-sectional relationships between insulin resistance and percentage of body fat, fitness, and physical activity in children—the LOOK study, Pediatric diabetes, vol. 10, no. 8, pp. 500-507.

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Title Contrasting longitudinal and cross-sectional relationships between insulin resistance and percentage of body fat, fitness, and physical activity in children—the LOOK study
Author(s) Telford, Richard D.
Cunningham, Ross B.
Shaw, Jonathan E.
Dunstan, David W.
Lafferty, Antony R. A.
Reynolds, Graham J.
Hickman, Peter E.
Southcott, Emma
Potter, Julia M.
Waring, Paul
Telford, Rohan M.
Journal name Pediatric diabetes
Volume number 10
Issue number 8
Start page 500
End page 507
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Munksgaard
Place of publication Copenhagen, Denmark
Publication date 2009
ISSN 1399-5448
1399-543X
Keyword(s) IR
children
PA
body fat
obesity
fitness
Summary Background: Knowledge of individual changes in insulin resistance (IR) and longitudinal relationships of IR with lifestyle-associated factors are of important practical significance, but little longitudinal data exist in asymptomatic children. We aimed to determine (a) changes in the homeostatic model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) over a 2-yr period and (b) comparisons of longitudinal and cross-sectional relationships between HOMA-IR and lifestyle-related risk factors.

Methods: Our subjects, 241 boys and 257 girls, were assessed at age 8.1 yr (SD 0.35) and again 2 yr later for fasting blood glucose and insulin, dual X-ray absorptiometry-assessed percentage of body fat (%BF), pedometer-assessed physical activity (PA), and cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF) by multistage running test.

Results: HOMA-IR was initially 9% greater in girls than boys and 27% greater 2 yr later. There was no evidence of longitudinal relationships between HOMA-IR and %BF in boys or girls, despite significant cross-sectional relationships (p < 0.001). In boys, there was evidence of a longitudinal relationship between HOMA-IR and both PA (p < 0.001) and CRF (p = 0.05). In girls, we found a cross-sectional relationship between HOMA-IR and CRF (p < 0.001).

Conclusions: HOMA-IR increases between 8 and 10 yr of age and to a greater extent in girls. Longitudinal, unlike cross-sectional, relationships do not support the premise that body fat has any impact on HOMA-IR during this period or that PA or CRF changes affect HOMA-IR in girls. These data draw attention to difficulties in interpreting observational studies in young children.
Language eng
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, Wiley-Blackwell Munksgaard
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020643

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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