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Game-centred models and teaching in culturally diverse settings

Peters, Jacqui and Shuck, Lisa 2009, Game-centred models and teaching in culturally diverse settings, in ACHPER 2009 : Creating active futures : Proceedings of 26th Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation Conference, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Qld., pp. 415-424.

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Title Game-centred models and teaching in culturally diverse settings
Author(s) Peters, Jacqui
Shuck, Lisa
Conference name ACHPER International Conference (26th : 2009 : Brisbane, Queensland)
Conference location Brisbane, Queensland
Conference dates 7-10 Jul. 2009
Title of proceedings ACHPER 2009 : Creating active futures : Proceedings of 26th Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation Conference
Editor(s) Cuddihy, Thomas F.
Brymer, Eric
Publication date 2009
Conference series Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation Conference
Start page 415
End page 424
Total pages 442 p.
Publisher Queensland University of Technology
Place of publication Brisbane, Qld.
Keyword(s) apprenticeship of observation
physical education
teacher education
TGfU
game-centred
culture
pedagogy
Summary This presentation draws on the observations and experiences that we, as teacher educators, have had using Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) as a pedagogical tool with generalist pre-service teachers in two different sites: Malaysia and Australia. TGfU is a game-centred pedagogy in which students learn the „Why‟ of game playing before the „How‟ of the skills associated with the game. This concept is based on a student-centred approach to learning. The benefit of this pedagogy to generalist teachers is the notion that they are not required to be a master of many sports. This narrative relates the observations and experiences of teacher educators of Malaysian and Australian generalist pre-service teachers confronted with teaching and learning TGfU for the first time in their culturally specific contexts. The two key issues arising from teaching the TGfU model were: the disparity in the cohorts‟ experiences arising from institutionalised conceptions by the pre-service teachers of what and how learning occurs in physical education; and the pre-service teachers‟ difficulty with implementing the TGfU model in a practical situation. Crossing the cultural divide for the Malaysian and Australian pre-service teachers required them to explore more fully the range of approaches to teaching and to recognise a more student-centred approach as a valid and authentic tool. As both teachers and observers of this process, our intention was to examine the two cohorts‟ learning and subsequent teaching with the aim of developing better understandings of the challenges when teaching TGfU in tertiary settings.
Notes This article is located on the 433rd page on the attached pdf.
ISBN 9781741072860
Language eng
Field of Research 130210 Physical Education and Development Curriculum and Pedagogy
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
HERDC collection year 2009
Copyright notice ©2009, School of Human Movement Studies, Queensland University of Technology
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020662

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.