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Supervisors are central to work characteristics affecting nurse outcomes

Rodwell, John, Noblet, Andrew, Demir, Defne and Steane, Peter 2009, Supervisors are central to work characteristics affecting nurse outcomes, Journal of nursing scholarship, vol. 41, no. 3, pp. 310-319.

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Title Supervisors are central to work characteristics affecting nurse outcomes
Author(s) Rodwell, John
Noblet, Andrew
Demir, Defne
Steane, Peter
Journal name Journal of nursing scholarship
Volume number 41
Issue number 3
Start page 310
End page 319
Publisher Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing
Place of publication Indianapolis, Ind.
Publication date 2009-09
ISSN 1547-5069
1527-6546
Keyword(s) stress
commitment
satisfaction
justice
aged care
Summary Purpose: To examine the predictive capability of the demand-control-support (DCS) model, augmented by organizational justice variables, on attitudinal- and health-related outcomes for nurses caring for elderly patients.

Design: The study is based on a cross-sectional survey design and involved 168 nurses working with elderly patients in facilities of a medium to large Australian organization.

Method: Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire consisting of scales designed for measuring independent (e.g., demand, control, support, organizational justice) and dependent (e.g., job satisfaction, organizational commitment, wellbeing and psychological distress) variables. Multiple regression analyses were undertaken to identify significant predictors of the outcome variables.

Findings: The DCS model explains the largest amount of variance across both the attitudinal and health outcomes with 27% of job satisfaction and 49% of organizational commitment, and 33% of psychological distress and 35% of wellbeing, respectively. Additional variance was explained by the justice variables for job satisfaction (5%), organizational commitment (4%), and psychological distress (23%).

Conclusions: Using organizational justice variables to augment the DCS model was valuable in better understanding the work conditions experienced by nurses caring for elderly patients. Inclusion of curvilinear effects added clarity to the potentially artifactual nature of certain interaction variables.

Clinical Relevance: The results indicated practical implications for managers of nurses caring for elderly patients in terms of developing and maintaining levels of job control, support, and fairness, as well as monitoring levels of job demands. The results particularly show the importance of nurses' immediate supervisors.
Notes
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Language eng
Field of Research 150311 Organisational Behaviour
Socio Economic Objective 910405 Public Sector Productivity
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30020763

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.